Tufts Financial Network
Events

Upcoming Events

  • Tufts Financial Network: Speaker Series
  • TBA

Past Events

  • Tufts Financial Network: Speaker Series
  • The End Game for Startups: When to Sell, How to Sell
  • Panelists:
  • Diane S. Hessan, J76, A11P
  • CEO of Communispace
  • Arthur L. Papas, A97
  • CEO and Co-Founder of Bullhorn, Inc.
  • Josef B. Volman, A88
  • Co-Chair of Business Law Department at Burns & Levinson, LLP
  • Louis J. Volpe, A71
  • Managing General Partner, Kodiak Venture Partners
  • Moderator:
  • Steven R. Koltai, A76, FG78, E12P, Managing Director and Founder, Koltai & Company
  • serial entrepreneur and former senior advisor to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton for the U.S. State Department's Global Entrepreneurship Program
  • Wednesday, MApril 2, 2014

  • Communispace
  • 290 Congress Street
  • Boston, MA
  • 6:00 pm – Welcome
  • 6:30 pm – Remarks
  • 7:30 pm – Reception
  • Register by March 19 by email, fax, or phone.
  • email: rsvpevents@tufts.edu
  • fax: 617-627-4203
  • phone: 888-320-4103

Read the panelists' bios (PDF)


  • Tufts Financial Network: Speaker Series
  • 21st Century Security and its Impact on the Global Economy
  • Featured Speaker:
  • James Stavridis, F83, FG84
  • Admiral, U.S. Navy (Ret.) and Dean, The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University
  • Wednesday, March 5, 2014

  • Grand Hyatt New York
  • 109 East 42nd Street at Grand Central Terminal
  • New York, New York
  • 6:00 pm – Welcome
  • 6:30 pm – Remarks
  • 7:30 pm – Reception
  • Register by February 19 by email, fax, or phone.
  • email: rsvpevents@tufts.edu
  • fax: 617-627-4203
  • phone: 888-320-4103
  • James Stavridis, F83, FG84
  • Admiral, U.S. Navy (Ret.) and Dean, The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University

A Florida native, Jim Stavridis attended the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, and spent more than 30 years in the Navy, rising to the rank of four-star admiral. Among his many commands were four years as the 16th Supreme Allied Commander at NATO, where he oversaw operations in Afghanistan, Libya, Syria, the Balkans, and piracy off the coast of Africa. He also commanded U.S. Southern Command in Miami, charged with military operations through Latin America for nearly three years. He was the longest serving combatant commander in recent U.S. history.

In the course of his career in the Navy, he served as senior military assistant to the Secretary of the Navy and the Secretary of Defense. He led the Navy’s premier operational think tank for innovation, Deep Blue, immediately after the 9/11 attacks.

He won the Battenberg Cup for commanding the top ship in the Atlantic Fleet and the Navy League John Paul Jones Award for Inspirational Leadership, along with more than 50 U.S. and international medals and decorations, including 22 from foreign nations.

He earned a Ph.D. from The Fletcher School at Tufts, winning the Gullion prize as outstanding student in his class, as well as academic honors from the National and Naval War Colleges as a distinguished student. He speaks Spanish and French.

Jim has published five books on leadership, Latin America, ship handling, and innovation, as well as more than a hundred articles in leading journals. An active user of social networks, he has thousands of followers on Twitter and friends on Facebook. His TED talk on 21st century security in 2012 has had more than 300,000 views.

He is also the chair of the board of the U.S. Naval Institute, the professional association of the nation’s sea services: Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, and Merchant Marine.

Jim is the 12th dean at The Fletcher School, a post he assumed in the summer of 2013. He is happily married to Laura, and they have two daughters – one working at Google and the other an ensign in the U.S. Navy.


  • Tufts Financial Network: Speaker Series
  • Thursday, April 25, 2013

Debating the Imagination Crisis and the Future of Innovation

Contributing author Harsha Kodali, FG14

Tufts Financial Network Speakers April 25, 2013

A palpable curiosity could be felt at the Ritz-Carlton on April 25, as members of the Tufts community gathered for the spring event of the Tufts Financial Network Speaker Series. The topic, "The Imagination Crisis: Are the Days of Revolutionary Innovations Over?," tackled innovation and its prospects, their profound and far-reaching consequences for the world and the professional and personal interests of the students and alumni in attendance.

The day's panel featured experts with wide-ranging experiences across the Boston region and the world, including Navjot Singh, Senior Partner at McKinsey & Company and Head of McKinsey Boston; Lynda Applegate, Sarofim-Rock Professor of Business Administration and Head of the Entrepreneurial Management Unit at Harvard Business School; and Steven Koltai, A76, FG78, E12P, Managing Director and Founder of Koltai & Company and Serial Entrepreneur and Former Senior Advisor to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton for the U.S. State Department's Global Entrepreneurship Program. Moderating the forum was the Senior Associate Dean of International Business and Finance and Executive Director of the Institute for Business in the Global Context, Bhaskar Chakravorti.

The panel touched upon the defense of present-day innovation, with Professor Applegate sharing the theory of "punctuated equilibrium," in which she described innovation as a process marked with points that spur a stream of innovation from a single dramatic impact. For example, innovations such as the cell phone were followed by commercialization that led to mobile apps and mobile money. "I think the pace of innovation is faster than it has ever been," she added.

Mr. Koltai described innovation as cumulative and a "basic human function," that is inherent in a portion of the population. He warned that the prototype for entrepreneurs are not "Steve Jobs, Oprah Winfrey and John Mackey – the gurus and the heroes of America today," but rather, those that "face tremendous adversity… without the proper enabling environment," and yet still succeed. Drawing on his experiences in the Middle East during the Arab Spring, he agreed with Applegate that the pace of innovation was accelerating and fears of its demise were over-wrought.

According to Applegate, at Harvard Business School they define entrepreneurship as "the relentless pursuit of opportunity without regard to the resources currently controlled." Entrepreneurs, she asserted, are "opportunity-seeking as opposed to simply thinking about how to manage today's assets," but at a certain point need resources to thrive, as well as the encouragement to take risks without acting reckless. "People are afraid to think big…" she said, adding that, "I don't think it's an imagination crisis, I think it's a confidence or a courage crisis to be able to start out on that journey."

Mr. Singh, countered, arguing that the issue is not monetary, but rather lies in an educational system that punishes those that think "out of the box." According to Singh, "we as people should be unconstrained and we should be imagining," whether one has the resources to pursue their idea or not. "No one can stop you from thinking of a big idea…And you should not be afraid to share those big ideas," said Singh.

Education remained a theme of the conversation as Applegate and Koltai affirmed Singh's point. Specifically referencing the Tufts $100,000 Business Plan Competition, Koltai said that entrepreneurs need financing, and not only those that operate in difficult environments. Financing must not be simply contained to the developed-to-developing world relationship; rather, financing freedom and the adoption of innovations should be encouraged through a global free flow of information.

Risk-taking and failure prevailed as almost essential to the entrepreneurial process, with Singh citing Japan as "a society that does not allow risk-taking and a society that does not allow failure," adding the number of small companies that start and fail in Japan is very small. He argued that the formula for innovation and its creation is simple and it is cultural, and can be assisted by a form of education that enhances society's willingness to take on risks.

The day's takeaways from all three panelists supported the notion that innovation is an ecosystem: one that encourages those that are willing to take risks, and furthermore, supports entrepreneurs through their failures as they adapt their methods to accommodate investment. Koltai summarized this idea by repeatedly highlighting the commonality among audience members—a shared interest in innovation and a relationship with Tufts was shared by all. This relationship, he noted, allows innovators to sense the backing of a community, such as Tufts, and to take risks that lead to innovation.

To view the video of the April panel in its entirety, please click here.

Contributing author Harsha Kodali is a first-year Master of International Business student at the Fletcher School, where he focuses on international finance and banking and development economics. Harsha has experience in the fields of financial services and international development. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Economics and International Relations from Claremont McKenna College.

  • Panelists:
  • Lynda Applegate, Sarofim-Rock Professor of Business Administration and Head of the Entrepreneurial Management Unit, Harvard Business School
  • Steven Koltai, A76, FG78, E12P, Managing Director and Founder, Koltai & Company, Serial Entrepreneur and Former Senior Advisor to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton for the U.S. State Department's Global Entrepreneurship Program
  • Navjot Singh, Senior Partner, McKinsey & Company, Head of McKinsey Boston
  • Moderator:
  • Bhaskar Chakravorti, Senior Associate Dean, International Business and Finance, and Executive Director, the Institute for Business in the Global Context, the Fletcher School at Tufts University


  • Tufts Financial Network: Speaker Series
  • "Economic and Market Outlook"
  • Featured Speaker Michael Cembalest, A84 Chairman of Market and Investment Strategy, JP Morgan Asset Management
  • Thursday, January 10, 2013

The Tufts Financial Network: Speaker Series
"Economic and Market Outlook"

Tufts Financial Network

On Thursday, January 10, 2013, the Tufts Financial Network welcomed Michael Cembalest, A84, Chairman of Market and Investment Strategy at J.P. Morgan Asset Management, as its featured speaker. With the help of a comprehensive PowerPoint presentation, Mr. Cembalest shared his vision and outlook on the current economy and its effect on global markets. Over 170 alumni, parents and friends gathered at the Grand Hyatt New York Hotel to hear his presentation. In addition guests had a unique opportunity to mingle with current Tufts students from the Tufts Financial Group and the Fletcher School’s Master of International Business program who were home for winter break.

Immediately following Mr. Cembalest’s remarks, guests attended an informal reception where they had an opportunity to meet the featured speaker and network with other TFN members.



View more event photos


TFN Leads the Way for Finance Education at Tufts

Tufts Financial Initiative

Tufts undergraduates considering careers in finance are now going to benefit from a pilot program that will help them enter the job market well-prepared and confident.

The Tufts Finance Initiative (TFI) was announced on September 22 at the Wall Street Crash Course, an event run by the Tufts Financial Network, in collaboration with University Advancement and Career Services.

TFN Leadership
The idea for the Tufts Finance Initiative came through alumni leader Bruce Grossman, A85, A16P, when he expressed an interest in giving students the preparation he would have appreciated as an undergraduate. Even with a degree in economics, he found it difficult to break into the financial world, and only with persistence did he finally land a job in investment banking.

Now the founder and CEO of Dillon Hill Capital, Grossman made a leadership gift toward the program’s $1.8 million goal.

"This program exists because of Bruce," says Jeff Winey, G90, director of Principal and Leadership Gifts. "We have a lot of alumni who have been successful on Wall Street, but Bruce felt very strongly that Tufts could do more to help young graduates get started. Alumni recognize the value of a liberal arts education, but they also want our students to have a bit more exposure to the real world – a course or a workshop – to help them be successful."

Additional alumni who are active in the Tufts Financial Network have provided significant support to fund the initiative, and so far, the University has raised $1.1 million toward its $1.8 million goal.

"We’re making headway," says Jeff. "If it's going to be successful, it has to have alumni involvement."

Tufts Financial Initiative

What is TFI?
The Tufts Finance Initiative is a five-year pilot program that will be housed in the Department of Economics in the School of Arts and Sciences. The University’s goal is to integrate components from the initiative into the curriculum in phases. When it is fully up and running, it will support:

  • positions for two new Professors of the Practice, with the first expected to be hired this spring;
  • workshops, trips to financial institutions, guest speakers, and additional finance courses;
  • summer internships and programs or activities related to internships;
  • a new position in the Office of Career Services dedicated to supporting students and alumni pursing finance careers and/or MBA programs.

James Glaser, dean of Academic Affairs for Arts and Sciences, says TFI will make a big difference for the growing numbers of students interested in careers in this industry.

"We recognize that students first come to Tufts for a quality liberal arts education, but these curricular changes will also allow them to develop more of the skills required in that field."

Student Reactions
Emily Sillari, A13, president of the Tufts Financial Group, a student-run organization whose activities include managing an investment portfolio, was thrilled to hear the good news.

"It's so exciting," says Emily. "It's going to be a key to helping Tufts students break into finance. It will definitely make us more marketable."

Emily is particularly looking forward to meeting the first of two Professors of Practice who will develop a finance curriculum. The Professors of Practice are drawn from industry and bring a “real world” perspective to the classroom.

Emily has had to become finance-savvy on her own, and so job interview questions like: "What is the Sharpe Ratio?" won’t throw her off. Still, there is no substitute for having access to finance professionals "we can reach out to on a regular basis for guidance. That’s going to be great."

Tufts Financial Initiative

TFN helps student navigate at the annual Wall Street Crash Course
This year's Wall Street Crash Course welcomed a record-breaking 200 students and more than 30 alumni volunteers who traveled to Medford to share their expertise on topics such as "Wall Street Basics," interviewing and networking skills, and career options in real estate.

Brigette Bryant, senior director of Development for Arts and Sciences, dubbed this year's event "the best ever."

"We have students who are curious, interested, and committed," she says. "They were all there at 7:45 AM sharp, dressed in their business attire and ready to learn. . . When I think of the impact this program has on our students, it’s amazing."

Alumni involvement included a session that provided a crystal clear overview of the "Capital Markets Lifecycle," which was moderated by Jeff Moslow, A86, A16P.

As part of the presentation, Moslow perfected a flow chart highlighting the story of Edgecast Networks, a private tech company founded by Alex Kazarani, A95, and Philip Goldsmith, A95, to illustrate the lifecycle of the capital markets. On hand to lend first-person narratives were Thomas Pappas, A83, an angel investor; and John Ball, A86, a venture capitalist whose company Steamboat Ventures is an investor in the tech company. Other participating alumni included Justin Nelson, A98, a banker with J.P. Morgan Chase.

"It was an excellent session," says Brigette. "They did it so well that the students could see all the various jobs open to them along the lifecycle, and see what might be of interest to them."


  • Tufts Financial Network: Speaker Series
  • Summer Alumni-Student Networking
TFN Summer Alumni-Student Networking

For members of the student-run Tufts Financial Group (TFG) "let's do lunch" has evolved from studying in DeWick over turkey wraps to formally sitting down with alumni in the Tufts Financial Network (TFN) for a networking lunch in New York City or Boston.

Over the past three summers, TFN alumni have hosted several meals with students, most serving as summer finance interns, to share the dos and don'ts of making a place for yourself on Wall Street and finding that all-important internship. This summer, three informal gatherings were held in New York and Boston involving 19 students and 10 alumni.

Kevin Magid, A85, managing director of the Audax Group and a member of the TFN Advisory Committee has participated for the past two years. "You see the students' desire to get to Wall Street without having the road map," he says. "You see talented students who may be at a slight disadvantage to students from other schools where the network to Wall Streeters has thrived for decades. You've been in their shoes and you want to change that."

All it takes, Magid adds, is helping one student at a time. "Just help one student with one question about what his or her next steps are and you've made a difference. No matter your level, you have the experience to advise."

His best advice to students? "Don't be shy; get yourself out there and network shamelessly. Tufts alumni will care and they will help."

Says TFG president Emily Sillari, A13, the TFN connection has been invaluable. "All of the alumni talk so candidly about their own experiences and transitions into finance and give great advice on decision-making: how to prepare for internships, full-time positions, and even business school." After Sillari's first lunch, she followed up with the two alumni at her table and both responded "almost instantly, willing to help."

Sillari spent the summer working in asset management at JP Morgan—thanks in part to the elephants in the room. "I reached out to two TFN alumni before the interview for advice, which was really helpful, and to my surprise there were two Tufts alumni in the actual interview," she says. "There are more Tufts alumni on Wall Street than one might expect, and they love to see Tufts students join their ranks."

The Tufts Financial Network wishes to thank the following alumni for participating in this summer's student-alumni gatherings:

Stephen Demirjian, A83, Director of Alternative Investments and Senior Portfolio Manager, Cadence Integrity Partners
Rick Henken, A80, AG81, President, Schochet Associates, Inc.
Peter Kamin, A84, A16P, Founder and Managing Partner, 3K Limited Partnership
Lawrence Kwon, A99, Senior Vice President, Moelis & Company
Kevin Magid, A85, Managing Director, Audax
George Mussalli, A95, Chief Investment Officer and Head of Research, Equity, PanAgora
Aseem Nambiar, A10, Analyst, Financial Institutions Group, UBS
Scott Schaevitz, A85, Chairman, Americas Real Estate Investment Banking with Barclays Capital
Jerome Shapiro, A03, Vice President, One William Street Capital
Alta Yen, J92, Managing Director, GE Energy Financial Services


  • Tufts Financial Network: Speaker Series
  • An Integrated Approach to Addressing Current Resource Crises
  • Wednesday, April 4, 2012
TFN Speakers April 4, 2012

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Alumni, students, and professors from the Tufts community descended on The Ritz-Carleton in Boston on Wednesday, April 4 for a networking and informational event entitled Resource Crises: Food, Fuel, and Water Scarcity – The Coming Conflict and Implications for Multinational Business and Finance. Sponsored by the Tufts Financial Network and The Fletcher School's Institute for Business in the Global Context (IBGC), the event was the last of a three-part series meant to address current global crises, their impacts, and the opportunities they present for learning and change.

Dean Bhaskar Chakravorti, head of the IBGC and its newest creation, Fletcher's Master in International Business program, moderated a panel which included three well-known Tufts minds: Kelly Sims Gallagher F00, FG03, associate professor of energy and environmental policy at Fletcher; Richard Vogel E05P, A05P, professor of civil and environmental engineering at Tufts and director of the graduate program in Water: Systems, Science, and Society; and Peter Walker, the Irwin H. Rosenberg Professor of Nutrition and Human Security at The Friedman School and director of Tufts' Feinstein International Center.

The integrated web that ties together food, fuel and water supplies was the recurring theme of the evening as choices in energy policy can have enormous unintended implications for water consumption. Yet, panelists focused on issues surrounding the efficient distribution of supplies that we already have, rather than the expected topic of scarcity.

"Rather than an energy crisis, we have a crisis in terms of human access to energy," began Professor Sims Gallagher. "Over 2 billion people in the world are without access to modern energy services. Globally, there are enough sources. They are just unequally distributed."

Food is no different, as we have problems of hunger and obesity, both of which, according to Professor Walker, represent populations which are not "well-fed."

The same is true for water. "The issue is a common one: distribution," said Professor Vogel.

Problems arise when you combine globally-determined prices with local markets. Ultimately the system creates a supply and demand mismatch, which has tremendous humanitarian consequences."We have a problem of how to make a commercial system supply a right," according to Professor Walker. "If we could figure this out we could solve a lot of problems."

Dean Chakravorti questioned the panel about how to view the impact of emerging markets, particularly China, on these scarcities.

"I think of China as one gigantic paradox," said Gallagher. He added,"China is the largest coal producer, the largest coal consumer, the biggest greenhouse gas emitter. But Chinese investments have helped create broad-based supply in both solar and wind, which has benefited the rest of us greatly."

Questions from the audience were equally thought-provoking and touched on issues of corruption and governance, countries' comparative policy approaches and negotiation strategies, and population growth. Yet, the topics were not exhaustive, nor could they be.

"We really haven't thought through all the potential crises to the degree that we need to, because the systems are so complex," warned Professor Vogel.

"The event only highlights why Fletcher is so useful," said Jessica Lane F09 of Cambridge Energy Research Associates during the reception which followed."No issue is separate. The world is integrated, and this is the way we need to think about and discuss it."

Story written by Heidi Packard, MIB Candidate F13

Heidi Packard, MIB 2013 is a first-year Master of International Business student at the Fletcher School, where she focuses on international finance and banking and international business and economic law. Heidi has experience in the fields of corporate governance research, financial services, and strategy consulting. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Economics and Government from Colby College.

  • Panelists:
  • Kelly Sims Gallagher, Associate Professor of Energy & Environmental Policy and Director of the Energy, Climate, and Innovation Program, The Fletcher School
  • Richard Vogel, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Director of the Graduate Program in Water: Systems, Science and Society
  • Peter Walker, Irwin H. Rosenberg Professor of Nutrition and Human Security and Director, Feinstein International Center, Friedman School of Nutrition, Science, and Policy

  • Moderator:
  • Bhaskar Chakravorti, Senior Associate Dean, International Business and Finance, and Executive Director, The Institute for Business in the Global Context, The Fletcher School

  • Tufts Financial Network: Speaker Series
  • Is Capitalism in Crisis?
  • Wednesday, March 7, 2012
TFN Speakers March 7, 2012

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Is capitalism in crisis? – this question posed by Bhaskar Chakravorti, Senior Associate Dean of The Fletcher School hung in the air of the Grand Hyatt New York as attendees at the Tufts Financial Network event on March 7, 2012 sat, eager for the panelists' response.

Panelists Michael W. Klein A11P, Clayton Professor of International Economic Affairs at the Fletcher School; Amar Bhidé, Thomas Schmidheiny Professor of International Business at the Fletcher School; Shumeet Banerji, CIO of Booz and Company; and Eileen Aptman J90, CIO of Belfer Management, LLC, each responded with an unwavering no and agreed that the popularity of this question arose more from its alliteration than from its relevance. Capitalism, they insisted, is well and thriving. However, the response was nuanced with the observation that the United States is suffering from internal inefficiency, causing the country’s recovery and long-term outlook to sputter.

Bhidé responded that the real economy (Main Street) functions like a true market economy, including a free-flow of capital efficiently allocated by decentralized decision makers. The financial system, on the other hand, runs through centralized decision makers such as credit agencies, resulting in a skewed misallocation of capital that could lead us to our financial doom – as evidenced by the financial crisis. The panelists were, again, unanimous in their agreement but reiterated that the principals of capitalism remain strong despite the apparent brawn of centrally planned economies like China.

Klein, who recently completed his term as Chief Economist at the U.S. Treasury, added that government continues to play a critical role in an efficient economy. The crisis has exposed self-regulated financial markets as unrealistic, and government has a responsibility to manage these systems. Klein further argued that the government has a responsibility to support homeowners through the fall-out of the crisis – at which point the panel fell out of agreement. Deep dissent rose among the panelists on the topic of housing. Should consumers wallow in their housing misfortune, or should government step in to support them? The expert opinions were irreconcilable, but all could agree on the fact that, regardless of its economic efficiency, households will not consume regardless of the interest rate or economic policy unless they feel some semblance of prosperity through a job or secure assets.

The panelists did purport that education is a critical element of long-term prosperity. Education is a key driver in on-going competitiveness and is a critical component of the United States' long-term prosperity. Aptman focused on the pay-offs of competitiveness, highlighting it as the key investment criterion in the wake of the European crisis. The intelligent European investments are those that addressed their competitiveness deficit and are therefore, poised for long-term, sustainable recovery. As Chakravorti noted, any conversation about competitiveness must include China. However, Klein quickly countered that China is not the monolith it appears to be. Fissures in government and society are beginning to show through, and its economic indicators are less promising. China certainly has plenty of room for resource misallocation and will continue to be a massive player in the market, but it has a long way to go before it overshadows the global economy. Moreover, Klein emphasized, regardless of China's position, competitiveness is not zero-sum.

The takeaway from this panel was that critical focus of the U.S. economic recovery must be its own competitiveness as this characteristic, above all others, will foster long-term prosperity. To achieve this objective, the country must address its root causes of economic inefficiency.

Story written by Lauren Gloede, MIB candidate F12, Rishad Sadikot, MIB candidate F12, Marina Vasilyeva, MIB candidate F13

Lauren Gloede, MIB 2012 is pursuing a Master of International Business (MIB) at The Fletcher School focusing on Global Financial Services and International Business Strategy. She most recently worked as an SME banking consultant for XacBank in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia and as a market entry consultant for a major U.S. bank. Prior to Fletcher, Lauren was an Associate at AllianceBernstein where she conducted portfolio and wealth forecasting analysis for high net worth clients. Lauren received a Bachelor of Arts in Economics and English from St. Olaf College.

Rishad Sadikot, MIB 2012, is a second year Master of International Business (MIB) degree student at The Fletcher School, with a focus on International Economics and International Finance & Banking. He most recently worked as a summer associate in the energy project finance division of Infrastructure Development Finance Corporation (IDFC). Prior to Fletcher, Rishad worked for five years with HDFC Asset Management Company Ltd., which is one of the largest asset management firms in India. Rishad received a Bachelor of Arts in Economics and Business from Jai Hind College, Mumbai University.

Marina Vasilyeva, MIB 2013, is a first-year Master of International Business student at the Fletcher School, pursuing her studies in Strategic Management & International Consulting and International Political Economy. Prior to Fletcher, Marina worked for five years as a director of a Russian telecommunication company's office in China where she was in charge of manufacturing, procurement, and logistics. Marina received a Bachelor of Arts in Chinese from St. Petersburg State University, Russia.

  • Panelists:
  • Eileen Aptman, J90, Chief Investment Officer, Belfer Management LLC
  • Shumeet Banerji, Chief Executive Officer, Booz and Company
  • Amar Bhide, Thomas Schmidheiny Professor of International Business, The Fletcher School
  • Michael W. Klein, William A. Clayton Professor of International Economic Affairs, The Fletcher School, and Former Chief Economist, Office of International Affairs, U.S. Treasury

  • Moderator:
  • Bhaskar Chakravorti, Senior Associate Dean, International Business and Finance, and Executive Director, The Institute for Business in the Global Context, The Fletcher School
  • Test Your Contextual Intelligence before the next TFN event. Gain the insights of Fletcher School experts as they tackle a series of 10 questions reflecting some of the complex challenges facing international business today.

    Tufts Financial Network: Speaker Series
  • Geopolitical Crisis: When the Front Page Converges with the Business Page

In the last days of a month that saw the death of Libya's ousted leader, the first post-revolution elections in Tunisia, and a deepening crisis in the Eurozone, over 125 members of the Tufts Financial Network gathered on October 25 at the Roosevelt Hotel in New York for the first in a series of events presented in collaboration with the Fletcher School's Institute for Business in the Global Context. The topic of the evening: Geopolitical Crisis: When the Front Page Converges with the Business Page. An enthusiastic audience wanted to know, "What does this near-term political volatility mean for business in the long-run?"

In a lively conversation that extended well into the evening over cocktails, Fletcher professors Vali Nasr and Daniel Drezner, joined by Gideon Rose, Editor of Foreign Affairs, and moderated by Dean Bhaskar Chakravorti, Executive Director of the Institute for Business in the Global Context, took the audience on a journey that touched on the epicenters of global systemic, financial, and political risk. The panelists debated the increasing correlation of financial and political risk worldwide, and shared their vision of how events may unfold in the near future.

Rose set the stage with an optimistic perspective, arguing that today's crises are best understood in the long-run as being either "productive crises," such as the Arab Spring, which has laid the groundwork for positive long-term developments, or "crises of wrenching volatility in an ever more globalized system, which at least allows the opportunity for broad-scale economic development." As a result, the near-term challenges to long-run stability, according to Mr. Rose, are our reactions to short-term crises, not the crises themselves.

In contrast, Prof. Drezner painted a less sanguine picture of the prospects for geopolitical stability, asserting that, "The biggest source of geopolitical risk right now is not actually in the Middle East. It's in the developed world. It's in the United States and the European Union. And the last time that was the case was the 1930's." He went on, "All the risks now are systemic, they're not geographic. So you're in a situation where if, in fact, you have a problem with Italy, that problem is eventually going to come to the United States." Of the many memorable moments of the evening, the audience is sure to remember Prof. Drezner's rather prescient statement: "We're now in a world – and just think about this for a second – where global financial stability depends on whether you trust Silvio Berlusconi to do the right thing."

Prof. Nasr reflected on the continuing Arab Spring and identified Saudi Arabia, Turkey, and Iran as the three players "circling the Arab world for influence." He added that although general opinion seems to hold that Turkey is winning this contest for regional power and Iran is losing, right now, "All three are winning and all three are losing. There is no clear winner."

Dean Chakravorti wrapped up the discussion on a hopeful note by reminding the audience that instability and opportunity go hand-in-hand: "The Eurozone is finally having a conversation on what integration is supposed to mean, and as for the Middle East…What can be better than seeing the entire region exercise its democratic franchise?"

According to Dean Chakravorti, the conversation was a reminder that the uncertainty of current events has a profound impact on global economic and business opportunities. "Business schools rarely train students to consider the overlap between business decisions and the public policy arena through issues like inclusive growth, international trade, and violent conflict," he said. "But this area of overlap is exactly where Fletcher's Master of International Business degree trains students to succeed."

Of course, the true test of an event of this kind is in the quality of the questions it provokes and the connections – intellectual, professional, and personal – that it inspires. On these measures, the first evening of this three part series set the bar quite high for the next event; Economic Crises: Disorder in the United States and the European Union will take place on March 7, 2012 in New York City. We look forward to seeing you there!

Story written by Tanya Hoke, MIB 2013 and Ravi Chaturvedi, MIB 2012

Tanya Hoke, MIB 2013 is a first-year student at the Fletcher School, where she is pursuing a Master of International Business (MIB) with a focus on strategic management and international security. She is a research assistant for the Center for Emerging Market Enterprises' Country Management project. Prior to coming to Fletcher, Tanya spent four years as a consultant at a political and security risk consulting firm in New York City, where she managed international business intelligence, corruption, and fraud investigations. Tanya received a Bachelor of Arts in Asian Studies from Swarthmore College.

Ravi Chaturvedi, MIB 2012 is an Emerging Markets Enterprise Scholar, having worked with organizations such as American Express, Standard Chartered, HSBC and Hewlett Packard in various capacities in the Middle East, North Africa (MENA) and in parts of Asia for nearly a decade prior to joining Fletcher. Most recently, he was the Head of the American Express portfolio and product P&Ls for the MENA region. Ravi has an undergraduate degree in liberal arts from India and an MBA from the Asian Institute of Management, Philippines.

  • Panelists:
  • Daniel Drezner
  • Professor of International Politics, the Fletcher School
  • Vali Nasr
  • Professor of International Politics, The Fletcher School
    Senior Advisor, Kissinger Associates
  • Gideon Rose
  • Editor, Foreign Affairs

  • Moderator:
  • Bhaskar Chakravorti
  • Senior Associate Dean, International Business & Finance and Executive Director, Institute for Business in the Global Context, The Fletcher School
TFN Speakers 25 October 2011

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  • Tufts Financial Network: Speaker Series
  • Wall Street Crash Course 2011
  • September 16-17, 2011
  • Tufts University, Boston

The second annual Wall Street Crash Course on campus Sept. 16-17 gave aspiring bulls and bears an up-close look at the ins and outs of the finance industry. The event drew 180 undergraduates for learning, discussions and networking with 30 Tufts alumni from the world of finance.

"The Wall Street Crash Course was truly remarkable, with more than double the students from the previous year," said Jay Joshi, A12, president of the student-run Tufts Financial Group, which co-hosted the event with the Tufts Financial Network and the Office of Career Services.

"The addition of an advanced session allowed even experienced students to learn something new," Joshi said, "while the number of impressive alumni who took the time to connect with students speaks volumes about Tufts and the people associated with the university."

William Huang, A12, majoring in international relations, said he took away a great deal from the event. "It opened my eyes to many different areas of finance from hedge funds to boutique investment banks," he said. "I liked the small table luncheons because I got a chance to learn more about the recruitment process in major investment banks."

Eileen Aptman, J90, chief investment officer at Belfer Management LLC, participated as a member of the Tufts Financial Network. "My day at the Crash Course showed me just how well prepared Tufts students are for a future in finance," she said. "They are extremely capable and bright, and welcomed a bit of guidance as to how best to position themselves for obtaining finance jobs or internships. I'm glad I could share my insights."

The idea for the Wall Street Crash Course came from Jeff Moslow, A86, a partner at Goldman Sachs and a member of the advisory committee of the Tufts Financial Network. This daylong workshop is designed to educate students on various finance career options and help them better prepare for the job interview process.

This year's event opened with a welcome dinner on Sept. 16 in the Coolidge Room of Ballou Hall that was addressed by President Anthony Monaco, A&S Dean Joanne Berger-Sweeney, and Trustee Chairman James Stern, E72, A07P. A full day of programming followed on Sept. 17 at the Perry and Marty Granoff Music Center.

With break-out groups and networking sessions, the Wall Street Crash Course offered students real-world, practical advice as well as personal connections with successful Tufts alumni in financial service careers.

President Anthony Monaco and Jeff Moslow, A86 at the Wall Street Crash Course dinner.

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  • Tufts Financial Network: Speaker Series
  • "Global Finance: Risk, Reward and Regulation"
  • Featured Speakers:

  • David Puth, A79

  • April 13, 2011
  • Ritz Carlton, Boston

On Wednesday, April 13, 2011 the Tufts Financial Network held its second annual Boston Speaker Series at the Ritz Carlton. This year's luncheon event featured David Puth, A79, Executive Vice President and Head of State Street Global Markets. Through his presentation entitled"Global Finance: Risk, Reward and Regulation," Mr. Puth, gave his perspective to the recent economic crisis to over 50 alumni, parents and friends who attended. A few undergraduates from the Tufts Financial Group and Fletcher students from the Masters of International Business program were also on hand to gain Puth's insights and meet other area alumni working in finance.

Brian Lee, A08P, A11P, VP University Advancement and David Puth, A79

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  • Tufts Financial Network: Speaker Series
  • "Real Estate in New York: an Evening with President Bacow and Jody Durst, E78, A12P"
  • Featured Speakers:

  • President Bacow and Jody Durst, E78, A12P

  • Monday, November 8, 2010
  • Sofitel Hotel

On Monday, November 8, 2010 the Tufts Financial Network, Tufts Alumni New York, and Tufts Alumni Shared Interest Groups sponsored Real Estate in New York: an Evening with President Bacow and Jody Durst, E78, A12P at the Sofitel Hotel. Durst, president of the Durst Organization, shared his insights to working as a developer in New York and the current real estate market. Over 150 alumni, parents and friends attended the discussion and enjoyed a networking reception prior to the event.

President Bacow and Jody Durst, E78, A12P

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  • Tufts Financial Network: Speaker Series
  • "2010 Wall Street Crash Course"
  • Featured Speakers:

  • Rob Walker, A04; Max Bernstein, A03; Rob Stricker, E69; Pierre Maman, A86; Michael Karsch, A90, F91; Joseph Rosano, A10; Jeff Moslow, A86; Bill Ortner, A89; Jonathan Trott, A10; Karen Kulvin, J92; Jerome Shapiro, A03; Peter Vogelsang, A84; Craig Goldberg, E76; Daniel Landers Silva, A10, Doug Atkin, A84; Greg Randolph, A81; Anthony Scaramucci, A86, A14P; Scott Schaevitz, A85; Federico De Giorgis, A84

  • Friday, October 15, 2010
  • Gifford House
2010 Wall Street Crash Course Faculty (from left to right)
Rob Walker, A04; Max Bernstein, A03; Rob Stricker, E69; Pierre Maman, A86; Michael Karsch, A90, F91; Joseph Rosano, A10;  Jeff Moslow, A86; Bill Ortner, A89; Jonathan Trott, A10; Karen Kulvin, J92; Jerome Shapiro, A03; Peter Vogelsang, A84; Craig Goldberg, E76; Daniel Landers Silva, A10. Missing from Photo: Doug Atkin, A84; Greg Randolph, A81;  Anthony Scaramucci, A86, A14P; Scott Schaevitz, A85; Federico De Giorgis, A84

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President of Tufts Financial Group which manages an equity portfolio funded by Tufts alumni, Lilly Bogis, A11, says, "Finance isn't in the Tufts culture as much as other schools. It's hard to find an outlet for that enthusiasm." From the outset, there was no shortage of student interest in the WSCC—just three days after advertisement, every seat was spoken for. On the morning of Saturday, October 16, the more than 80 participating undergraduate students were prompt and fully prepared to meet with the diverse alumni faculty—most of whom had traveled from New York to lend their unique voices.

The day opened with a video address by Stern. Moslow and Bogis also welcomed attendees and invited them to speak candidly throughout the day via microphones stationed at the front of the room, which allowed for organic dialogue and well-rounded participation.

The first paneled session tackled the capital market life cycle and was moderated by Moslow, with panelists Michael Karsch, A90, F91; Karen Kulvin, J92; Gregory Randolph, A81; Anthony Scaramucci, A86; and Scott Schaevitz, A85. Next on the agenda: Preparing for the Interview, presented by Pierre Maman, A86, managing director at JPMorgan Chase & Company, who traveled from London especially for the course. Maman dissected the interview process from interviewing skills to marketing individuality, to summer internships, to preparing for a career while still in college. A subsequent question and answer session was moderated by Douglas Atkin, A84, and paneled by younger faculty fresh from the Hill: Max Bernstein, A03; Daniel Landers, A10; Jerome Shapiro, A03; Jonathan Trott, A10; and Robert Walker, A04.

Moslow says a lot of valuable advice naturally arose from the Q&A session: building upon Maman's earlier interviewing advice, Karsch, of Karsch Capital Management, spoke adamantly about creating a unique, memorable persona to differentiate one applicant from hundreds.

Following the Q&A session and a brown bag lunch that included mock interviews, students and faculty divided into break-out sessions that allowed senior-, mid-, and entry-level faculty to describe and discuss different careers in the finance world: asset management and hedge funds, private equity and leverage, and investment banking.

Additional alumni faculty included: Federico De Giorgis, A84; Craig Goldberg, E76; Roger Krakoff, A81, F83; William Ortner, A89; Joseph Rosano, A10; and Rob Stricker, E69.

The entire day was incredible, says Bogis, who noted that most helpful were the personal stories alumni told of their journeys to the Street. "I started Tufts as premed," says Moslow, "and lasted one month in biology." After a quick shift to economics and classics, Moslow adds that he later decided to pursue a career on Wall Street. "Well, that was the good news," he says. "The bad news was I couldn't get a job. I thought about business schools, but you needed work experience—so it was a ‘catch-22'. I liked school, and thought that maybe if I got into a really good law school, I'd have the opportunity to interview. Eventually I moved from law school to Wall Street, but there were a lot of rough patches along the way."

Greg Randolph, A81, managing director of Greenhill & Co., says he saw a lot of himself in the attentive students at the course. "I told them, I was lucky," he says. "When I was at Tufts, I had an uncle who managed to get me a summer internship after my sophomore year and that may well have changed my life—just to have some experience. Even if it's in an area you may not exactly want to be in, getting 10-12 weeks of experience on the Street, talking to people, and gaining a better idea of what a banker or trader or research analyst does for a living is extremely valuable for someone coming right out of school who hasn't had a financial job."

According to Randolph and Moslow, attendees took that advice to heart—both have already heard from multiple students and connected beyond the course.

"The response was stunning," says Moslow. "While the primary goal of this was to equip and educate students, I think as important of a benefit that manifested itself was the engagement of 20 alumni in time and effort, and creating more of an affinity towards the university post-Tufts. And I can't tell you how many alumni came up to me afterwards and told me what an amazing experience it was to be up there."

Moslow recalls that the closest he ever came to a true finance course at Tufts was Corporate Finance with Professor Fortune. "An ironic name," he adds, "but he was great." He hopes the Wall Street Crash Course will be institutionalized and occur annually, and not only add to the growing population of Tufts alumni on Wall Street, but also provide an outlet for students like he was—like Bogis—who are eager for knowledge of the financial world and the inside scoop on what's in store for them on the Street.


  • Tufts Financial Network: Speaker Series
  • "The Current Market Environment: Have we gone too far too fast?"
  • Featured Speakers:

  • Samuel T. Byrne, A87, Managing Partner & Co-Founder, CrossHarbor Capital Partners
  • A. Dana Callow Jr., A74, Managing General Partner, Boston Millennia Partners
  • Michael S. Gordon, A87, Partner, Vinik Asset Management

  • Moderated by:
  • Peter H. Kamin, A84, Partner, ValueAct Capital
  • Wednesday, May 26, 2010
  • The Ritz Carlton, Boston Common
  • 10 Avery Street, Boston
  • Boston, MA 02111
  • 11:45 a.m. Welcome
  • 12:15 p.m. Luncheon
  • 12:45 p.m. Panel Presentation
  • 1:30 p.m. Event Concludes

On May 26, the Tufts Financial Network held its inaugural event in Boston at the Ritz-Carlton. Guests enjoyed a luncheon and panel discussion entitled"The Current Market Environment: Have We Gone Too Far, Too Fast?" Moderated by Peter Kamin, A84, partner, ValueAct Capital, the panel included Sam Byrne, A87, managing partner, CrossHarbor Capital Partners; A. Dana Callow Jr., A74, managing general partner, Boston Millennia Partners; and Michael Gordon, A87, partner, Vinik Asset Management. Trustee Brian Kavoogian, A84, was also on hand to welcome attendees.

Dana Callow, A74, Brian Kavoogian, A84, Peter Kamin, A84, Samuel Byrne, A87, Michael Gordon, A87

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  • Tufts Financial Network: Speaker Series
  • The "CEO Experience" with:
  • Ellen Kullman, E78, A12P, President and CEO, Dupont de Nemours and Co.
  • Andrew Liveris, A07P, President and CEO, Dow Chemical Company
  • Jonathan Tisch, A76, Chairman and CEO, Loews Hotels
  • 6:00 p.m.
  • Monday, April 5, 2010
  • JP Morgan Chase & Co.
  • 270 Park Avenue, 50th Floor, New York, NY

On April 5, Jamie Dimon, A78, CEO of JPMorgan Chase & Co., hosted a panel discussion on "The CEO Experience" at JPMorgan headquarters on Park Avenue. Ellen Kullman, E78, A12P, chair and CEO, Dupont; Andrew Liveris, A07P, president, chairman, and CEO, Dow Chemical; and Jonathan Tisch, A76, chairman and CEO, Loews Corporation shared their insights on the current economy and the numerous challenges facing today's CEOs. President Lawrence S. Bacow moderated the discussion among the panelists, all of whom are current members of the Tufts Board of Trustees. More than 200 alumni, parents, and guests were on hand for the event and reception.

Jonathan Tisch, A76, President Bacow, Ellen Kullman, E78, A12P, Andrew Liveris, A07P, Jamie Dimon, A78

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  • Tufts Financial Network: Speaker Series
  • An evening with

    Mort Zuckerman, Editor-in-Chief, U.S. News & World Report, Chairman and Co-Publisher of the New York Daily News, and Chairman, Boston Properties, Inc.
    featuring
    David H. Faber, A85, Anchor and Reporter, CNBC
  • Thursday, December 10, 2009
  • Millennium Broadway Hotel
  • 145 West 44th Street
  • Between 6th Avenue and Broadway, New York, NY
  • 6:00 p.m. Welcome
  • 6:30 p.m. Conversation with David Faber, A85, and Mort Zuckerman
  • 7:30 p.m. Reception

On Thursday, December 10, 2009 members of the Tufts Financial Network and other guests were treated to an informative discussion between Mort Zuckerman and David Faber, A85 at the Millennium Broadway Hotel in New York. Zuckerman is the Editor-in-Chief of U.S. News & World Report; Chairman and Co-Publisher of the New York Daily News; and Chairman of Boston Properties. Faber, who moderated the first TFN event featuring Jamie Dimon and Jeff Kindler, is an award winning anchor and reporter for CNBC.

Attendees gained Mr. Zuckerman's insights on the current state of the economy, the real estate market, and the future of journalism, and they had the opportunity to offer questions from the floor on other relevant topics. A reception was held in the lobby of the Hudson Theater immediately following the program.

David H. Faber, A85, President Bacow, Mort Zuckerman

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  • Tufts Financial Network: Speaker Series
  • Strong Finance Careers in a Weakened Economy: A Tufts Alumni Perspective a timely panel presentation and networking reception. Senior finance professionals from the Tufts community examine the impact of the recession on careers in the financial sector, with questions of interest to alumni at all professional levels. Panelists addressed strategies for a successful job search, career growth in an uncertain economic climate, weighing opportunities abroad, starting a boutique firm, and alternative career options in government or industry.
  • Monday, October 19, 2009
  • Loews Regency Hotel, New York
  • 540 Park Avenue
  • New York, NY
  • 6 p.m. - 9 p.m.
  • co-sponsored by the Tufts Financial Network, New York Tufts Alliance, and Tufts Alumni Career Services

On Monday, October 19, more than 70 alumni and parents attended a panel presentation and networking reception at the Loews Regency Hotel. The event, co-sponsored by the Tufts Financial Network, New York Tufts Alliance, and Tufts Alumni Career Services, brought together senior finance professionals from the Tufts community to examine the impact of the recession on careers in the financial sector.

Joining the discussion were Michael Fung, A79, A12P, chairman, Private Banking Asia, JP Morgan Chase & Co; Lynn Zuckerman Gray, J71, founder and chief executive officer of Campus Scout, LLC, and former global chief administrative officer, Real Estate Group, at Lehman Brothers/Barclay's Capital; Jeff Moslow, A86, partner, Goldman Sachs & Co.; and Harry Segalas, A82, managing partner and chief investment officer, HS Management Partners, LLC. David Beck, A99, formerly of Bain Capital, served as moderator of the discussion.

Panelists addressed topics including career opportunities abroad, strategies for a successful job search, starting a boutique firm, alternative career options, and assessing the future job market in the coming years. Those in attendance were also invited to ask questions from the floor. Upon the conclusion of the program, guests had an opportunity to mingle and seek additional insights from the panelists.

David Beck, A99; Michael Fung, A79, A12P; Lynn Zuckerman Gray, J71; Harry Segalas, A82; Jeff Moslow, A86

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  • Tufts Financial Network: Speaker Series
  • Economic Upheaval & Financial Frauds – How the Regulators and Prosecutors are Responding to Turbulent Times a panel discussion with Steven D. Feldman, A92, Partner, Herrick, Feinstein LLP, head of the White Collar Criminal Defense practice; Former Securities Fraud Prosecutor, Assistant United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York, Bruce Karpati, A92, Assistant Regional Director, New York Regional Office, Division of Enforcement, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, and head of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's Hedge Fund Working Group, Michael Rogal, A91, Senior Counsel, Department of Enforcement of FINRA, Former Senior Counsel, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, Southeast Regional Office, Steven Weiss, A92, General Counsel, Chief Administrative Officer, and Chief Compliance Officer, The Roosevelt Investment Group, Inc., Adjunct Professor of Law at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law in Manhattan. Moderated by Dan Richards, A12P, Tufts University, Professor of Economics.
  • Tuesday, June 16, 2009
  • InterContinental The Barclay New York
  • 111 East 48th Street
  • New York, NY
  • 6:00 p.m. Welcome
  • 6:30 p.m. Panel Discussion
  • 7:30 p.m. Reception

The Tufts Financial Network hosted its third event of the year on June 16th at the InterContinental The Barclay New York. Professor Dan Richards of the Tufts Economics Department moderated a panel discussion entitled "Economic Upheaval and Financial Frauds: How the Regulators and Prosecutors are Responding to Turbulent Times." Three of the four panelists brought first hand knowledge as either regulators or prosecutors of financial fraud while the fourth panelist offered the perspective of financial institutions now facing greater scrutiny from state and federal government.

Lending their voices to the debate were Steven Feldman, A92, lead partner in the White Collar Defense practice of Herrick, Feinstein LLP and former Assistant United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York; Bruce Karpati, A92, Assistant Regional Director in the Enforcement Division in the New York Regional Office of the Securities and Exchange Commission and head of the Commission's Hedge Fund Working Group; Michael Rogal, A91, Senior Counsel in the Enforcement Department at the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority; and Steven Weiss, A92, general counsel, chief administrative officer, and chief compliance officer for the Roosevelt Investment Group.

Attendees were able to continue the discussion with all panelists and the moderator at a networking reception immediately following the program.

Steven Feldman, A92; Bruce Karpati, A92; Steven Weiss, A92; Vice President of Advancement Brian Lee, A08P, A11P; Michael Rogal, A91; Professor Daniel Richards, A12P

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  • The Tufts Financial Network: Speaker Series
  • The Future of Hedge Funds and Private Equity a panel discussion with Bruce Grossman, A85, Avenue Capital Partners; Michael Karsch, A90, F91, Karsch Capital Management; David Wachter, E85, W Capital Partners; James Wong, A86, Paulson & Company Incorporated. Moderated by President Lawrence S. Bacow.
  • Thursday, January 29, 2009
  • Millennium Broadway Hotel
  • 145 West 44th Street
  • New York, NY
  • 6:00 p.m. Welcome
  • 6:30 p.m. Panel Discussion
  • 7:30 p.m. Reception

On January 29, the Tufts Financial Network launched its Speaker Series at the Millennium Broadway Hotel in New York City. Tufts President Lawrence S. Bacow moderated a panel discussion, "The Future of Hedge Funds and Private Equity." Panelists included Bruce Grossman, A85, Avenue Capital Group; Michael Karsch, A90, F91, Karsch Capital Management; David Wachter, E85, W Capital Partners; and James Wong, A86, Paulson & Company Incorporated. In light of the faltering world and US economies, each panelist offered his assessment of current economic challenges and future expectations as Wall Street seeks greater stabilization. Members of the audience also had an opportunity to question the panelists and moderator.

Over 180 alumni, parents and friends appreciated the insights offered by the panel. Guests enjoyed socializing and networking in the lobby of the Hudson Theater at the conclusion of the program.

President Larry Bacow  with Jamie Dimon, A78, Jeff Kindler, A77, A11P, and David Faber, A85, at  the TFN's inaugural event

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  • Tufts on Wall Street
  • A Student-Alumni Networking Reception designed to connect Tufts students interested in finance careers with alumni working in the field. Students, who attended alumni presentations in the afternoon, gathered with Wall Street alumni for a networking reception in the evening.
  • Friday, September 26, 2008
  • Hosted by JPMorgan
  • 277 Park Avenue
  • New York, NY
  • 5:00 - 7:00 p.m.

  • Tufts Financial Network Inaugural Event
  • A Panel discussion with Jamie Dimon, A78, CEO, JP Morgan Chase & Co and Jeff Kindler, A77, A11P, CEO, Pfizer, Inc. moderated by David Faber, A85, anchor, CNBC.
  • Wednesday, September 10, 2008
  • JP Morgan
  • 270 Park Avenue, 50th Floor
  • New York, NY
  • 5:30 p.m. Registration
  • 6:30 p.m. Panel Discussion
  • 7:30 p.m. Reception

On September 10, the Tufts Financial Network held its inaugural event at JP Morgan Chase in New York City. David Faber, A85, anchor on CNBC, moderated a discussion between Jamie Dimon, A78, CEO of JP Morgan Chase & Co, and Jeff Kindler, A77, A11P, CEO of Pfizer, Inc. The panel offered a dynamic discussion on the economy, health care, and other timely topics. Friends from their college days, Dimon and Kindler added affable banter and insights from their years on the Tufts campus.

President Lawrence S. Bacow and Provost Jamshed Bharucha joined 300 alumni, parents and friends for this very special Tufts evening. After the program concluded, guests at all professional levels enjoyed socializing and networking with other Jumbos working in the financial sector.

The Tufts Financial Network is extremely grateful to all who made this event a success, especially to Jamie Dimon and JP Morgan Chase for hosting us in their beautiful new space.

President Larry Bacow  with Jamie Dimon, A78, Jeff Kindler, A77, A11P, and David Faber, A85, at  the TFN's inaugural event

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