Alumni | WSSS | Tufts University

WSSS Alumni

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Christine Ash

Christine Ash
Graduate School of Engineering
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering


Degree and Year of Graduation
MS, 2008

Advisors
John Durant, Doug Brugge, Wig Zamore (Mystic View Task Force)

Thesis
Spatial distribution of vehicular air pollutants in the air near highways

Two highway transects in Somerville, MA were monitored via a mobile laboratory for several air pollutants, including PAHs, NOx, CO, CO2, SOx, and analyzed spatially and temporally to determine their distribution in the air.

Post-Graduation Employer and Position
Environmental Engineer at Environmental Protection Agency

 
WSSS Student Negin Ashoori

Negin Ashoori
School of Engineering
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering


Degree and Year of Graduation
MS, 2012

Advisor
Elena Naumova, School of Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Primary Research Interests
Water consumption patterns and enteric infection transmission in rural and urban settings of Vellore, India

Selected Awards & Fellowships
WSSS Research Fellowship, 2011
TIE Graduate Student Fellowship, 2011

 
WSSS Student Melissa Bailey

Melissa Bailey
Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy
Agriculture, Food and Environment Program


Degree and Year of Graduation
PhD, 2011

Advisors
Parke Wilde (Chair), Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy
Timothy Griffin, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Agriculture, Food and Environment Program

Kent Portney, Graduate School of Arts & Sciences, Department of Political Science

Dissertation

Livestock Production and Water Quality: An Analysis of Politics and Implementation of USDA's Environmental Quality Incentives Program

This dissertation project seeks to understand the role of EQIP in promoting sustainable or unsustainable livestock production with a focus on water quality and manure management issues. Coupling qualitative and quantitative methods from political and environmental science, this project will analyze the interest groups politics that shaped EQIP program priorities, evaluate whether EQIP is meeting water quality goals set by federal policy and create a framework on what factors or characteristics of livestock operations are most critical to sustainability. This framework will be used to test the hypothesis that EQIP priorities are, in some cases, failing to meet sustainability goals.

Publications

• Bailey, M. & Merrigan, K. (2010). "Rating Sustainability: An Opinion Survey of National Conservation Practices Funded Through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP)." Journal of Soil and Water Conservation 65(1): 21A-25A.

• Bailey, M. "Environmental Policy and Livestock Production: The Role of EQIP in Water Quality". Sponsored Panelist/Presenter. National Environmental Public Health Conference, CDC, Atlanta, Georgia (October 2009). Abstract published in Public Health Reports.

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills, Software, Languages
Part of multi-country team who conducted a transboundary watershed assessment in Mesoamerican Barrier Reef region, statistical software (SPSS, STATA, SAS), qualitative analysis software (NVIVO) and basic GIS
 
WSSS Student Jeff Bate

Jeffrey Bate
School of Engineering
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering


Degree and Year of Graduation
MS, 2012

Advisor
Rich Vogel, School of Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Annette Huber-Lee, School of Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Primary Research Topic
Applications of information economics in water resources management and planning.

Selected Awards & Fellowships
WSSS Research Fellowship, 2011

 
WSSS Student Heather Bell

Heather Bell
Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy
Agriculture, Food, and the Environment Program


Degree and Year of Graduation
MS, 2011

Advisor
Parke Wilde, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy

Primary Research Interests
Community conflicts over water, agricultural water use, survey research

 

Joshua Berkowitz
Graduate School of Arts & Sciences
Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning


Degree and Year of Graduation
MA, 2008

Advisors
Julian Agyeman (UEP), Rusty Russell (UEP), Paul Kirshen (CEE)

Thesis
Environmental Equity Assessment of Combined Sewer Overflows in Mystic River Watershed

In my research, I sought to investigate the location of combined sewer overflows (CSOs) in relation to community demographics within the Mystic River Watershed using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and on the ground field work. This relationship has not been assessed in any comprehensive way to date and will help to determine if, and the extent to which, CSOs constitute an environmental justice violation in the communities of the watershed. Such findings are discussed and policy and planning implications are addressed.

Other Project Titles
Integrated assessment of the impacts of runoff on coastal water quality in the Bahamas

Thesis
Berkowitz, Joshua. Into the Mystic: Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs) and Community Demographics in the Mystic River Watershed: An Environmental Equity Analysis. MA UEP 2008. Advisors: Dr. Julian Agyeman, Dr. Rusty Russell, Dr. Paul Kirshen, Dr. Barbara Parmenter

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills
Highly trained and experienced environmental policy and planning professional. Among other areas of expertise, I have experience in natural resource management, air, energy, climate, and water resources planning and policy, environmental and public policy analysis, GIS and spatial analysis, and community sustainability planning. In addition, I have extensive experience carrying out academic and policy research; regulatory and legislative analysis; policy advocacy planning and execution; financial and technical analysis and oversight; nonprofit and program fundraising and development; marketing and outreach communications planning; organizational and program strategic planning; and have extensive program, organizational and nonprofit management experience. I am also a highly trained and experienced mediator and facilitator with experience in high-level stakeholder dialogue and collaborative decision-making, specializing in environmental conflict and dispute resolution. Additionally, I am a proficient professional writer and editor, with experience writing and editing content for policy, technical and lay audiences.

Software
MS Office (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access), MS Publisher, Adobe Creative Suite (Acrobat Professional, Photoshop, InDesign, Dreamweaver), ArcGIS, GPS, SPSS, QuickBooks, PeopleSoft, RefWorks, EndNote, All Internet applications and desktop email clients, PC and Mac proficiency.

Language
Conversational Spanish

Post-Graduation Employer and Position
Director and Project Manager at California Environmental Dialogue (CED)

Read an extended interview with Joshua >>

Racey Bingham
Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy
Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy
Agriculture, Food and Environment Program


Degree and Year of Graduation
MA/MS, 2007

Advisors
Bill Moomaw, William Lockeretz

Thesis
Bingham, Racey. Multiple Use Services: Meeting the Productive and Domestic Needs of the Rural Poor. MALD Fletcher, MS Friedman 2007. Advisors: Dr. Bill Moomaw, Dr. William Lockeretz

This report uses a detailed household survey in the Islamic Republic of Mauritania to answer the following questions: Does the net impact of productive water strengthen rural livelihoods and reduce poverty of rural households? If so, to what extent do productive uses of water form an important contribution to these livelihoods? Although the realization that the poor and water scarce distribute their water consumption across multiple activities is not a new, attempting to account for these various uses is. Estimating these incremental benefits and costs will help governments and non-governmental organizations value water systems appropriately, and can also inform the design of community water systems. Above all, if the balance of costs and benefits at the household level is known it will determine if multiple-use water services (MUS) are truly a superior approach to water resources development.

Other Project Titles
Integrated assessment of the impacts of runoff on coastal water quality in the Bahamas

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills, Software, Languages
Dryland rural water resource management for agriculture, animal husbandry and drinking water; large-scale irrigation infrastructure works in central Mali for rice and vegetable production; urban water and sanitation infrastructure in Bangui, Central African Republic; small-scale watering systems for livestock and watershed protection in the Champlain Valley, NY. Languages: French, Arabic (Hassaniya), basic German, Spanish, Fulfulde (Pulaar), Bambara. Software: ArcGIS, Stata, AutoCAD

Post-Graduation Employer and Position
Operations Specialist, World Bank, Bangui, Central African Republic working primarily on urban water and sanitation infrastructure projects including emergency flood response infrastructure, boreholes, sewers and drainage

Read an extended interview with Racey >>

 

Benjamin Bornstein
Graduate School of Engineering
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering


Degree and Year of Graduation
MS Environmental Health, 2009

Advisor
Anne Marie Desmarais

 

Thesis
An Evaluation of the Exposure Parameters and Possible Risks Posed to Human and Ecosystem Health Due to Fish Consumption from Areas of the Mystic River Watershed

Recent data collected by certain environmental and health agencies suggests that various species of fish within sections of the Mystic River Watershed, MA, have high levels of toxicity. The three most commonly found substances are DDT, chlordane, and PCBs. These compounds have been banned for years in the US but are persistent in the environment and can bioaccumulate to dangerously high levels, especially in the tissues of higher trophic-level organisms. Anecdotal evidence indicates that many community members, especially from certain environmental justice and ethnic populations, may be relying on Mystic-caught fish as a common source of food. These substances are known to cause detrimental effects on human and animal health after high or prolonged exposure. Through my research I hope to gain insight as to the level of risk the contaminated fish pose to humans that consume them, and what sort of long term implications contaminated water and sediments may have on the ecosystem. I will also try to determine exposure statistics for people that consume toxic fish, and try to assess if state advisories are appropriate and having the desired impact.

Other Project Titles
WSSS Practicum, Nassau, Bahamas

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills, Software, Languages
ArcGIS, Coastal Surveying, New England Ecosystems, Risk Assessment, Public Health, Geology, Spanish

Post-Graduation Employer and Position
Environmental Scientist at Eastern Research Group (ERG)

 
WSSS Student Andrea Brown

Andrea Brown
School of Engineering
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering


Degree and Year of Graduation
MS, 2012

Advisor
Elena Naumova, School of Medicine, Public Health and Community Medicine

Primary Research Topic
Transmission of diarrheal disease though the land surface: a comparison of rural and urban slum areas in southern India

Selected Awards & Fellowships
WSSS Research Fellowship, 2011
TIE Graduate Student Fellowship, 2011

 
WSSS Student Lauren Caputo

Lauren Caputo
School of Engineering
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering


Degree and Year of Graduation
MS, 2011

Advisor
Rich Vogel, School of Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Paul Kirshen, School of Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Primary Research Interests
My research project examines stormwater management strategies under a changing climate. With the acceptance that precipitation patterns change over time comes the reality that the "static design problem"
no longer holds. How should we design stormwater management practices under a dynamic climate? Or more importantly, how should we retrofit stormwater management systems in urban areas that are already prone to flooding or have combined sewer overflows? I use the combined sewer system in Somerville, Massachusetts as a case study to explore the possibilities of LID control under different climate scenarios using EPA's SWMM software.

Selected Awards & Fellowships
WSSS Research Fellowship, 2010

 
WSSS Student Jeffrey Cegan

Jeffrey Cegan
School of Engineering
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering


Degree and Year of Graduation
MS, 2011

Advisors
Rich Vogel, School of Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Paul Kirshen, School of Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Primary Research Interests
Environmental surprises are bound to occur. Surprise is induced by uncertainty and chaos in environmental systems and exacerbated by anthropogenic attempts to gain control over these systems. I am interested in the concept of surprise and its role in water resources management. In particular, I focus on the connection between surprise and resilience. I explore methods in which integrated adaptive management and critical thinking embrace uncertainty and absorb surprise impacts, and explain how regional preparedness is critical to mitigate adverse effects of climate-induced surprises.

Selected Awards & Fellowships
WSSS Research Fellowship, 2010

 

Katie Cerretani
Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy
Agriculture, Food and Environment Program


Degree and Year of Graduation
MS, 2009

Advisors
Willie Lockeretz, Kathleen Merrigan

Primary Research Topic
Urban agriculture and water reclamation/reuse

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills, Software, Languages
3 yrs working on compliance end of USAID- and USDA- funded food aid programs, some proposal writing; spanish

Post-Graduation Employer and Position
Presidential Management Fellow at USDA Forest Service

 
WSSS Student Lauren Cole

Lauren Cole
Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning


Degree and Year of Graduation
MA, 2013

Advisors
Ann Rappaport, Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning

Scott Horsley, Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning

Primary Research Interests
Ecological Sanitation, Civic Engagement

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills, Software, Languages
Low Impact Development

 
WSSS Student Sarah Coleman

Sarah Coleman
Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy
Agriculture, Food and the Environment Program


Degree and Year of Graduation
MS, 2011

Advisor
Jennifer Coates, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy

Primary Research Interests
Regional food systems as a means to support environmental conservation, social justice, and health

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills, Software, Languages
WSSS Advisory Committee Member, 2010-2011

 
WSSS Student Laura Crossley

Laura Crossley
Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning


Degree and Year of Graduation
MA, 2013

Advisors
Rusty Russell, Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning

Shelly Krimsky, Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning

Primary Research Interests
Zero Waste, Stormwater Management, Land Conservation, Environmental Ethics and Economics

 
WSSS Student Sarah Coleman

Claudio Deola
Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy
Development Economics and Human Security, International Environment and Natural Resource Policy


Degree and Year of Graduation
MAHA, 2011

Advisor
Astier Almedom, Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy
Jeffrey Griffiths, Department of Public Health and Family Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine

Primary Research Interests
Water and Sanitation in Urban Humanitarian Crisis

Summary of Research
Deola, Claudia. Health Outcomes of Crisis-affected Urban Displaced: a review. MAHA 2011.

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills, Software, Languages
I have been working in complex emergencies contexts since 2003 as engineer humanitarian worker, namely in Afghanistan, Sudan and Pakistan. I collaborated with INGOs and Internation Organizations in the domain of water supply system, sanitation, hygiene promotion, rehabilitation and reconstruction of conflict affected infrastructures. Furthermore I carried out development projects in Algeria and Tanzania, respectively on water treatment station design and gravity, ground water and rain harvesting water supply systems.

Selected Awards & Fellowships
WSSS Research Fellowship, 2011

 

Jalal Elhayek
Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy
Agriculture, Food and Environment Program


Degree and Year of Graduation
MS, 2011

Advisor
Tim Griffin, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Agriculture, Food and Environment Program

Primary Research Interests
Water quality, water scarcity, sustainable agriculture policy

Post-Graduation Employer and Position
Policy Researcher (Internship) at Stockholm Environment Institute

 

Holly Elwell
Graduate School of Arts & Sciences
Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning


Degree and Year of Graduation
MS, 2009

Advisor
Mary Davis, Graduate School of Arts & Sciences, Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning


Thesis
Elwell, Holly. Defining Capacity: Community-Based Watershed Organizations and Climate Change Adaptation. MA UEP 2009. Advisor: Mary Davis

Post-Graduation Employer and Position
Environmental Planner at Horsley Witten Group

Read an extended interview with Holly >>

WSSS Student Rhiannon Ervin

Rhiannon Ervin
School of Engineering
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering


Degree and Year of Graduation
PhD, 2012

Advisor
Andrew Ramsburg, School of Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering


Primary Research Interests
Quantification of DNAPL architectural features using partitioning tracers in a modified push-pull test

In recent history, many groundwater aquifers have been contaminated by accidental or purposeful disposal of organic compounds, such as chlorinated solvents. Currently, a great deal of research is being conducted on how best to remove these contaminants from the subsurface and restore groundwater quality. Within the aquifer, chlorinated solvents form a non aqueous phase which is distributed as small blobs in individual sand grain pores, or as larger blobs in interconnected pores, known as pools. The best type of remediation and the benefit of attempting remediation is largely dependant on this spatial distribution. The purpose of my research is to develop a tool that can be used to estimate the spatial distribution of the contamination, with the hope that this information will help guide remediation designs.

Thesis or Dissertation
Ervin, Rhiannon, Assessment of Partitioning Tracers for Estimation of DNAPL Source Zone Architecture.

Publications
Ervin, R.E., Boroumand, A.B., Abriola, L.M. and C.A. Ramsburg. Kinetic limitation on tracer partitioning in ganglia dominated source zones. Journal of Contaminant Hydrology, Vol. 126, Issue 3-4 , pp. 195-207, Novemeber 2011.

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills, Software, Languages
Fate and transport of chemicals in the environment, chemical lab work, experimental design

Post-Graduation Employer and Position
Geosyntec Consultants

Derek Etkin
Graduate School of Engineering
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering


Degree and Year of Graduation
MS, 2008

Advisors
Paul Kirshen, Richard Vogel, Steven Block

Primary Research Topic
Utilizing Seasonal Forecasts for Reservoir Operations in the Comoé River Basin, Burkina Faso.

A network of reservoirs and diversion structures in the Comoe River Basin in southwestern Burkina Faso, West Africa, provides municipal water supply and irrigation water for sugarcane agribusiness and a population of subsistence farmers. The region is characterized by severe intra seasonal and inter-annual variability with respect to precipitation and reservoir inflows. Reservoir operations are generally conservative, even during wet years. This work shows how seasonal precipitation and stream flow forecasts can provide more efficient and equitable release decisions throughout the entire irrigation cycle. Working closely with stakeholders and local institutions, a stochastic linear programming model was developed which translates conditionally weighted scenario-tree stream flow and precipitation forecasts into optimal release schedules for reservoir operators to implement in real-time as forecasts and system conditions change. A VBA-based graphic user interface (GUI) is used to ensure implementation and ease of use by operators.

Other Project Titles
- Global reservoir storage-yield performance regression
- Real-time updated rainfall runoff modeling in the Comoe River Basin

Thesis
Etkin, Derek. Utilizing Seasonal Forecasts to Improve Reservoir Operations in the Comoé River Basin. MS Environmental and Water Resources Engineering. Advisor: Paul Kirshen

Publications

• Roncoli, C., Kirshen P., Etkin D., Sanon, M., Somé, L., Dembélé, Y., Sanfo, B. J., Zoungrana, J. and Hoogenboom, G. From Management to Negotiation: Technical and Institutional Innovations for Integrated Water Resource Management in the Upper Comoé River Basin, Burkina Faso. Environmental Management. August, 2009.

• Etkin D., Kirshen, P.H., Watkins, D., Diallo, A.A., Hoogenboom, G., Roncoli, C., Sanfo, B. J., Sanon, M., Somé, L. and Zoungrana, J.. Stochastic Linear Programming for Improved Reservoir Operations for Multiple Objectives in Burkina Faso, West Africa.World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2008, May 2008, Honolulu Hawaii.

• McMahon, T.A., Vogel, R.M., Pegram, G.G.S., Peel, M.C. and D. Etkin, Global streamflows – Part 2 Reservoir storage-yield performance, Jour. of Hydrology, Vol. 347, No. 3-4, pp. 260-271, 30 December 2007.

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills, Software, Languages
Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), ArcGIS, HEC-RAS, HEC-HMS, SWMM, STELLA, Mathematical Optimization (GAMS), Linear Programming, Stochastic Modeling, 2 years as water treatment engineer, Land Surveying, French

Post-Graduation Employer and Position
CDM Smith, Cambridge. Water Resources Engineer.

Read an extended interview with Derek >>

 
WSSS Student Will Farmer

William H. Farmer
Graduate School of Engineering
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering


Degree and Year of Graduation
MS, 2012

Advisors
Richard Vogel, School of Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Primary Research Topic
Estimation of Monthly Flow Timeseries in Ungaged Basins

 

Ana Martha Fernandes
Graduate School of Engineering
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering


Degree and Year of Graduation
MS, 2005

Advisors
Paul Kirshen, Richard Vogel

Primary Research Topic
Regional Siting of Fecal Sludge Treatment Facilities: St. Elizabeth, Jamaica

In the developing nation of Jamaica 70% of the population depends on on-site sanitation systems (OSS) which can provide an effective and low-cost option for rural wastewater treatment. However, there are serious environmental and human health effects associated with their mismanagement and deterioration. This thesis was focused on developing a methodology to determine suitable areas for fecal sludge (FS) treatment systems and to select an optimum combination of FS treatment options for the region. Historically, fecal sludge management has been studied and addressed as a localized problem, while this research was aimed at developing a systematic analysis of regional sludge management. A regional decision model of FS treatment was developed which incorporated treatment alternatives to hauling or pumping to existing treatment systems. The problem was formulated as a mixed-integer programming model which selected the optimal combination of treatment options and locations for the region based on a variety of social, economic, and environmental constraints.

Publications

• Young, Charles A., Marisa Escobar, Martha Fernandes, Brian Joyce, Michael Kiparsky, Jeffrey F. Mount, Vishal Mehta, David Purkey, Joshua H. Viers, and David Yates. Modeling the Hydrology of Climate Change in California’s Sierra Nevada for Sub-Watershed Scale Adaptation. Journal of the American Water Resources Association. Manuscript Submitted June 2009.

• Fernandes, Ana Martha, Paul H. Kirshen and Richard M. Vogel. Optimal Siting of Regional Fecal Sludge Treatment Facilities: St. Elizabeth, Jamaica. Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management. Volume 134, Issue 1, January/February 2008.

• Klein, R.J.T.; Alam, M.; Burton, I.; Dougherty, W.; Ebi, K.L.; Fernandes, M.; Huber-Lee, A.; Rahman, A.A.; Swartz, C. Applications of Environmentally Sound Technologies for Adaptation to Climate Change: Technical Paper for the UNFCCC Secretariat. 2006.

• Elgizouli, Ismail, Nagmedlin Goubti, Martha Fernandes, and Bill Dougherty. 2005. NAPAssess: A Decision Support Tool for Use in the Sudan NAPA Process. Presented at the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP 11), Montreal, Canada. November 28-December 9, 2005.

Thesis
Fernandes, Ana Martha. Regional Siting of Fecal Sludge Treatment Facilities: St. Elizabeth, Jamaica. MS CEE 2005. Advisors: Dr. Paul Kirshen and Dr. Richard Vogel

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills, Software, Languages
Water and Sanitation Field/Project experience in Benin, Guatemala, Jamaica, Nepal, Nicaragua, Rwanda, and the United States of America. Software: Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), GAMS and Lingo Optimization Software, ESRI GIS, Idrisi, AutoCAD, MathCAD, Macromedia Dreamweaver MX, Microsoft Applications. Languages: French, Portuguese, and basic Spanish.

Post-Graduation Employer and Position
Montgomery Watson Harza (MWH) Global, Boston, Project Engineer

Read an extended interview with Martha >>

 
WSSS Student Stephanie Galaitsis

Stephanie Galaitsis
Civil and Environmental Engineering
Department of Environmental and Water Resources Engineering


Degree and Year of Graduation
MS, 2013

Advisor
Richard Vogel, School of Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Primary Research Interests
Domestic Water, Water in the Middle East, Water and Satellite Imagery, Systems Engineering

Selected Awards & Fellowships
WSSS Travel Grant (2011, 2012), Jack and Pauline Freeman Foundation Graduate Fellowship (2011-2012), Emerging Academics Program, World Water Forum (2012), Earle F. Littleton Award (2013)

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills
SEI intern, MYWAS Water Project, Palestinian Water Authority, LINDO, GIS, Remote Sensing, French and Arabic.

Michael Gove
Graduate School of Arts & Sciences
Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning


Degree and Year of Graduation
MA, 2009

Advisor
Barbara Parmenter

Primary Research Topic
Indicators for Community Watershed Managment in Pico Bonito National Park, Honduras

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills, Software, Languages
UNESCO International Hydrological Programme Intern, GIS, Spanish, Portuguese

Post-Graduation Employer and Position
ORISE Fellow, Office of Water at U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

 

Karen Patterson Greene
Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning


Degree and Year of Graduation
MS, 2012

Advisor
Rusty Russell, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning

Primary Research Interests
Risk assessment of contaminated sediments and policy implications

Other Water Relevant Experience
Having worked in various aspects of watershed management for the last 12 years

 
WSSS Student Gogi Grewal

Gogi Grewal
Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy
Food Policy and Applied Nutrition Program
School of Medicine
Department of Public Health and Community Medicine


Degree and Year of Graduation
MS/MPH, 2011

Advisors
Peter Walker, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Alan Shawn Feinstein International Center
Janet Forrester, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine

Primary Research Interests
Food security and international health, access to water and sanitation, and interaction with nutrition

Selected Awards & Fellowships
WSSS Research Fellowship, 2010

 
WSSS student Patrick Hall

Patrick Hall
Graduate School of Arts & Sciences
Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning


Degree and Year of Graduation
MS, 2006

Advisors
Rachael G. Bratt, Graduate School of Arts & Sciences, Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning

Thesis
Hall, Patrick. Getting with the Program: Rural Radio and Water Resource Planning in Sub-Saharan Africa. MA UEP 2006. Advisor: Professor Rachel G. Bratt

Katie Houk
Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy
Food Policy and Applied Nutrition Program


Degree and Expected Year of Graduation
MS, 2012

Advisor
Beatrice Rogers, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Food Policy and Applied Nutrition Program

Primary Research Interests
International food security and water

 

Jyotsna Jagai
Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy
Food Policy and Applied Nutrition Program
School of Medicine
Department of Public Health and Community Medicine


Degree and Year of Graduation
PhD, 2009

Advisors
Elena Naumova (chair), Jeffrey Griffiths, Patrick Webb, Paul Kirshen

Primary Research Topic
Environmental Determinants of Seasonal Patterns of Waterborne Diseases

Waterborne diarrheal diseases, which are a concern in both developing and developed countries, demonstrate strong seasonal patterns suggesting environmental drivers for these diseases. The goal of this thesis was to evaluate seasonal parameters of waterborne diarrheal diseases with respect to environmental determinants. In Aim 1, we utilized a meta-analysis approach demonstrate disease incidence is associated with meteorological parameters, temperature and precipitation, but strength and direction of the association varies by disease. In Aim 2, we assessed the impact of river discharge on the seasonal pattern of outcomes of gastrointestinal (GI) infections in the elderly for two watersheds and demonstrated that the seasonal patterns GI illnesses are not driven by the seasonal patterns in river discharge but there is an interaction. In Aim 3 we demonstrated that density of overall livestock production is a risk factor for enteric infections; specifically that the density of cattle is a risk factor for protozoan infections in the U.S. elderly. Our findings regarding sensitivity of seasonal patterns of waterborne diseases to environmental time-varying exposures provides policy makers and public health practitioners insight to the degree of environmental associations and potential determinants of these patterns.

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills, Software, Languages
Statistical Software (SPSS, SAS), Matlab, GIS - ArcGIS, statistical methods, epidemiology, survey methods

Post-Graduation Employer and Position
US EPA, Chapel Hill , NC, Post Doctoral Fellow

In the News
"Seasonal Sickness." The Telegraph. [Calcutta] 11 June 2012

Read an extended interview with Jyotsna >>

 

Yudan Jiang
School of Engineering
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering


Degree and Year of Graduation
MS, 2013

Advisors
Shafiqul Islam

Primary Research Topic
Flood and rainfall analysis, stormwater management

 

Georgia Kayser
Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy
Development Economics, International Environmental Policy, and Water Resources Management


Degree and Year of Graduation
PhD, 2011

Advisors
William Moomaw, Julie Schaffner, Jeffery Griffiths, Beatrice Rogers

Primary Research Topic
An Improved Millennium Development Goal for Water: Testing Hard and Softpath Solutions

Currently the world is on track to achieve the Millennium Development Goal for water, to reduce by 2015 those without access to improved drinking water. Unfortunately, achievement of the MDG for water is not enough. To reduce diarrheal disease, access to “improved” water sources is not enough. Achieving deeper goals of improved health requires that the water, households consume, be safe, or free of pathogens. Ms. Kayser’s research tests the relative merits of technological and programmatic options for improving drinking water supply safety and sustainability over the long-term. Specifically, the researcher has established collaborative partnerships with Non-Governmental Organizations to analyze the household health, economic and sustainability impacts of household versus community-based drinking water technologies in Honduras, and the efficacy of "build-and-walk-away" drinking water supply versus "build-and-support-with-on-going technical assistance" water supply in small rural and peri-urban areas of El Salvador.

Publications

• Kayser, G. (2007). Hydrodiplomacy: Negotiating a regional ridge to reef approach to the world’s water crisis. International Environmental Negotiation, XVI. Enhancing the Effectiveness of the Treaty Making System. Eds. Susskind, L., Moomaw, W.

• Kayser, G., Morrison, S., Pixarro, C. (2007). Socioeconomic findings in Rapid Assessment of Anthropologic Impacts on Select Transboundary Watersheds of the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef System (MBRS) Region (editors, Bailey, M., Meerman, J., Vasquez, M., and Parish, A.), Mesoamerican Barrier Reef Systems Project, Belize City, Belize, May 2007.

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills, Software, Languages
Socio-economic field research coordinator for a multi-country interdisciplinary team that conducted a transboundary watershed assessment for the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef region; Coordinated a pre-post evaluation of the household health and economic impacts of small drinking water treatment plants in rural Honduras for two NGOs.
Software: statistical software (STATA), ArcGIS.
Languages: English and Spanish.
 
Peter Kelly-Joseph

Peter Kelly-Joseph
Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning


Degree and Year of Graduation
MA, 2011

Advisors
John Witten,Graduate School of Arts & Sciences, Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning
Scott Horsley, Graduate School of Arts & Sciences, Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning

Research interests:
Coastal zone management, water quality in coastal areas

Thesis abstract:
Coastal protection permitting data from 780 Notice of Intent submissions is presented from three towns on Cape Cod, Massachusetts to analyze the coastal protection permitting experience since the creation of the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act in 1978. Notice of Intent records serve as a measure of demand for coastal protection and indicate that demand is rising in the towns of Truro, Wellfleet and Eastham and there appears to a trend towards soft coastal protection alternatives. A number of potential anthropogenic and natural variables are discussed that could influence demand for coastal protection permits but no clear trends are identified. Municipal decision-making processes should to be refined to plan for upward trends in coastal protection permitting to take advantage of wide regional expertise in the field.

Thesis:
Kelly-Joseph, Peter T. Analysis of the Coastal Protection Experience in Three Towns on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. MA, UEP 2011. Advisors: Mr. John Witten and Mr. Scott Horsley

Post-Graduation Employer and Position:
ORISE Fellow, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Ocean, Ocean and Coastal Protection Unit, EPA New England.

 

Lauren Klonsky
Graduate School of Engineering
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering


Degree and Year of Graduation
MS, 2008

Advisors
Richard Vogel, Lee Minardi, Jack Ridge

 

Primary Research Topic
Effective Discharge and Sediment Transport in Rivers

The concept of effective discharge, Qe, introduced by Wolman and Miller in 1960 is that stream flow which transports the most sediment over time. Recently, numerous investigators have questioned how meaningful Qe is as a descriptor of sediment transport and new discharge indices, such as the half-load discharge Q1/2, have been introduced to improve the precision with which one describes the ability of a particular discharge to transport sediment. Numerous recent studies have also suggested that among the various empirical estimators of Qe, there does not seem to be a uniform consensus as to which is most consistent and meaningful. This study uses an example to clarify the method of estimation of both Qe and Q1/2. We show that the discharges up to the effective discharge for the Mississippi River at St Louis, are only responsible for carrying 25% of its long term sediment load. We question whether or not such a discharge is truly "effective" in terms of its ability to transport sediment, over time. An alternative index, the half load discharge, is recommended instead, because it is always responsible for transporting 50% of the long term sediment load.

Publications
Lauren Klonsky1,* and Richard Vogel2, Effective Measures of “Effective” Discharge. Journal of Geology.

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills, Software, Languages:
Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), MathCAD, Environmental Engineering Consultant, Intern, Research Assistant on a constructed wetland facility, Spanish

Post-Graduation Employer and Position
Water Resource Engineer at CDM Smith

 

Karen Claire Kosinski
School of Engineering
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering


Degree and Year of Graduation
PhD, 2011

Advisors
John Durant, School of Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

David M. Gute, School of Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Miguel Stadecker, Sackler School of Biomedical Sciences, Immunology Program
Jeanine Plummer, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Kwabena M. Bosompem, Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research

Primary Research Topic
Novel Preventative Measures for the Control of Schistosomiasis: A Preliminary Trial in Adasawase, Ghana

Approximately thirty-five percent of children and adolescents in Adasawase, Ghana are infected with the parasite Schistosoma haematobium. They contract the parasite in several local rivers where they play, bathe, and collect water. The disease caused by this parasite, urinary schistosomiasis, may be characterized by painful urination, blood in the urine, and possible long-term bladder pathology. I hypothesize that a water recreation structure will be a novel, effective, and sustainable intervention for schistosomiasis.

Publications
Kosinski, Karen. A Novel Community-Based Water Recreation Area for Schistosomiasis Control in Rural Ghana. Submitted to the Journal of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene for Development, November 2010. [Supported by WSSS Research Fellowship.]

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills, Software, Languages
Excel, Lindo, Mathcad, Visual Modflow, Spanish, very basic Twi

Post Graduation Interests
International work, use of water resources engineering to prevent/mitigate public health problems, especially parasitic diseases, in the tropical world

Selected Awards & Fellowships
WSSS Research Fellowship, 2010

 
WSSS Student Jonathan Lautze

Jonathan Lautze
Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy
Graduate School of Engineering
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering


Degree and Year of Graduation
MALD 2005, PhD in CEE 2008

Advisors
MALD: Adil Najam, Paul Kirshen
PhD: Paul Kirshen, Jeff Griffiths, Matthew McCartney (IWMI), Andrew Spielman (deceased)

Primary Research Topic
Transboundary Water Management in Africa, Reservoir management and malaria transmission in Ethiopia.

The construction of dams in Africa is often associated with adverse malaria impacts in surrounding communities. However, the degree and nature of these impacts are rarely quantified and the feasibility of environmental control measures (e.g., manipulation of reservoir water levels) to mitigate malaria impacts has not been previously investigated in Africa. My thesis topic examined entomological and epidemiological research conducted in the vicinity of the Koka Dam and Reservoir in Ethiopia. Key findings of the study include: a) substantially greater malaria case rates observed in communities close to the reservoir; b) greater abundance of malaria vectors found in community dwellings close to the reservoir as a consequence of breeding habitats created along the reservoir shoreline; and c) faster falling water levels are associated with lower mosquito larval abundance in shoreline puddles. These findings confirm the role of the reservoir in increasing malaria transmission and suggest there may be potential to use dam operation as a tool in integrated malaria-control strategies.

Publications

• Gerlak, A., Lautze, J., Giordano, M. in submission. Data and Information Sharing in transboundary Water Law. International Studies Quarterly.

• Giordano, M. and Lautze, J. forthcoming. Managing Waters in Extreme Environments: The Role of International Actors in Africa. In: Managing Waters in Extreme Environments.

• Lautze, J., and Kirshen, P. 2009. Water Allocation, Climate Change, and Sustainable Peace: The Palestinian Position. Water International 34(2): 189-203.

• Lautze, J., Barry, B., and Youkhana, E. 2008. Changing Paradigms in Volta Basin Water Management: Customary, National, and Transboundary. Water Policy 10(6): 577-594.

• Lautze, J., and Giordano, M. September, 2007. Demanding Supply Management and Supplying Demand Management: Transboundary Waters in Sub-Saharan Africa. Journal of Environment and Development 16(3): 290-306.

• Lautze, J., and Kirshen, P. September, 2007. Dams, Health, and Livelihoods: Lessons from the Senegal, Suggestions for Africa. International Journal of River Basin Management 5(3).

• Lautze, J., McCartney, M., Kirshen, P., Olana, D., Jayasinghe, G., and Spielman, A. 2007. The Effect of a Large Dam on Malaria Risk: The Koka Reservoir, Ethiopia. Tropical Medicine and International Health 12(8): 982-989.

• Lautze, J., and Giordano, M. 2007. A History of Transboundary Law in Africa. Chapter 5 in Grieco, M., Kitoussou, M., and Ndulo, M., eds. The Hydropolitics of Africa: A Contemporary Challenge. Cambridge Scholars Press.

• Lautze, J., Barry, B., and Youkhana, E. 2006. Changing Interfaces in Volta Basin Water Management: Customary, National, and Transboundary. ZEF Working Paper 13. Culture, Knowledge and Development Group. Center for Development Research: Bonn.

• Lautze, J. and Giordano, M. 2006. Equity in Transboundary Water Law: Valuable Paradigm or Merely Semantics? Colorado Journal of International Environmental Law and Policy 17(1): 89-122.

• Lautze, J., and Giordano, M. 2005. Transboundary Water Law in Africa: Development, Nature, and Geography. Natural Resources Journal 45(4): 1053-1087.

• Lautze, J., Reeves, M., Vega, R., and Kirshen, P. 2005. Water Allocation, Climate Change, and Sustainable Peace: The Israeli Proposal. Water International 30(2): 197-209.

Post-Graduation Employer and Projects
IWMI, Postdoc, Projects include USAID-funded water governance in MENA region and ADB-funded Water Resources Outlook Study for Asia

Read an extended interview with Jonathan >>

WSSS student Simcha Levental

Simcha Levental
Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning


Degree and Year of Graduation
MA, 2011

Advisor
Laurie Goldman, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning

Primary Research Interests
Urban aspects of water management; poverty, conflict, and water; ground water; remote sensing and GIS

Projects
The Battir Spring - the Road to a Safe Water Resource (Click here to open document)

Regina Lyons

Regina Lyons
Graduate School of Arts & Sciences
Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning


Degree and Year of Graduation
MA, February 2009

Advisors
Rusty Russell
Marji Erickson-Warfield (Brandeis University)

Primary Research Topic
An Implementation Evaluation if the No Discharge Area Program in Casco Bay, Maine.

A No Discharge Area (NDA) is a federally approved state designation for a water body in which all sewage, treated or untreated, is prohibited from being discharged from any vessel. Under Section 312 (f) (3) of the Clean Water Act, a state can petition the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), through a written application, for approval of a NDA designation for some or all of its coastal waters. My program evaluation analyzed the implementation and process of the No Discharge Area Program within Casco Bay for quality review and program clarification. The three program evaluation instruments used were 1) a mail survey of Casco Bay boaters, 2) an in-person survey of Casco Bay pumpout facility operators, and 3) site visits of the Casco Bay pumpout facilities. Recommendations for the improvement of the Casco Bay NDA program were made based on the overall research findings.

Publications

• Co- Author, “Conserving Freshwater and Coastal Resources in a Changing Climate,” A Report Prepared for The Nature Conservancy, August, 2007.

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills, Software, Languages
Coastal nutrient criteria survey (CTD apparatus & chlorophyll filtration), Dye studies, Electofishing, National River and Streams Assessment, Groundwater well monitoring, SPSS statistical software

Post-Graduation Employer and Position
U.S. EPA, Region 1 (New England), Office of Ecosystem Protection, Ocean and Coastal Unit
Biologist

Read an extended interview with Regina >>

 
WSSS Student Jack Melcher

Jack Melcher
School of Engineering
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Graduate School of Arts & Sciences
Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning


Degree and Year of Graduation
MS, 2011

Advisors
Richard Vogel, School of Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

John Durant, School of Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Scott Horsley, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning
Rusty Russell, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning

Primary Research Topic
Stormwater Policy and Planning

My research will examine the use of stormwater modeling techniques to place Best Management Practices and meet water quality goals.

Other Project Titles
WSSS Practicum 2009; Engineers Without Borders potable water supply in San Jose Villanueva, El Salvador

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills, Software, Languages
Internship at the Charles River Watershed Association, Summer 2009. Five years of experience as a project engineer doing land development, public water supply design and testing, on-site wastewater disposal system design, and stormwater design in the Pioneer Valley, Massachusetts. Internship at the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection – wetlands mapping project. Competent using AutoCAD Civil 3D, performing topographic surveys, and researching property records. Licensed as a Professional Engineer and as a Soil Evaluator in Massachusetts.

Post Graduation Interests
I hope to work on projects that use technology to make better decisions on complex issues.

Selected Awards & Fellowships
WSSS Research Fellowship, 2010

 

Armando Milou
Graduate School of Arts & Sciences
Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning


Degree and Year of Graduation
MA, 2008

Advisors
Scott Horsley, Paul Kirshen

Primary Research Topic
Stormwater Low-Impact Development BMPs feasibility for Low-Income Communities in San Pedro Sula, Honduras.

The objectives of the project include the identification of successful LID policies, technologies and practices that can potentially be transferred to Low-Income Settlements (LIS) in San Pedro Sula, Honduras. Particular attention will be given to areas with higher slope gradient, susceptible to erosion, landslides and mudflows. Special consideration will be given to current stormwater infrastructure in LIS and the "common dilemmas" they face. Primary data will be collected on-site during February and March 2008, and will include person-to-person questionnaires on 100 households in low-income settlements--tracked using GPS; and interviews with key stakeholders, such as municipal water commissions, NGOs and local politicians via e-mail, survey monkey and/or personal interviews. The goal of this project is to measure the feasibility, applicability and barriers to the implementation of policies that promote the use of LID BMPs. The georeferenced locations will be used to analyze the responses according to their proximity to natural drainage flows and "formal" city limits; elevation; and the extent of nearby deforestation. The study is partially funded by a Graduate Student Research Award from Tufts' Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

Other Project Titles
Redeveloping the Lower Mystic River: Case Studies and Best Practices; Integrated Water Management (Flooding and water quality) Alewife Brook, MA

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills, Software, Languages:
Geographic Information Systems (ArcMap)

Post-Graduation Employer and Position
GIS Analyst and Urban Planner Consultant at Mercy Corps, GIS Strategic Consultant at MICRA Indonesia

Read an extended interview with Armando >>

WSSS Student Melissa Ng

Melissa Ng
School of Engineering
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering


Degree and Year of Graduation
MS, 2011

Advisor
Rich Vogel, School of Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Primary Research Topic
Impacts of increased urbanization on hydrologic processes within two neighboring river basins in Massachusetts: 1940s - present

My study will evaluate the combined effects of landuse, climate change and water use on the entire streamflow regime (low flows, average annual flows and floods), providing insight to the importance of considering interactions among these variables when evaluating the sensitivity of streamflow. Two watersheds within eastern Massachusetts, the Aberjona River Basin and the Neponset River Basin, will be used as case studies utilizing data from the 1940s until present. Both watersheds are similar in size and have had significant increases in urbanization. Interestingly, one river basin shows an overall increase in streamflows over the past few decades, whereas the other basin shows a decrease in low flows. In order to compare the effects of changes in landuse, climate and water use, we introduce a multivariate regression approach to estimate their elasticity. The sensitivity of streamflow to such changes is shown to be site specific and to depend heavily on the temporal and spatial scale of the analysis.

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills, Software, Languages
Chemical and bacteriological lab work, ArcGIS

Post-Graduation Employer and Position
Staff Engineer at Geosyntec Consultants

 

Makito Ohikata
Graduate School of Arts & Sciences
Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning


Degree and Year of Graduation
MA, 2009

Advisor
Rusty Russell

Primary Research Topic
Slum improvement/Disaster reconstruction

I am interested in a combined policy/strategy of water management issues and housing issues in developing countries. An example of such an approach is a slum improvement policy that addresses the provision of housing, drinking water, and sanitation in slum environments in developing countries or post disaster reconstruction policy for low-income communities including resettlement and disaster prevention for flooding or tsunami. I intend to focus on a specific topic and area for my graduate thesis.

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills, Software, Languages
AutoCAD, VectorWorks, Spanish, Japanese

 
WSSS Student Nat Olken

Nathaniel Olken
School of Engineering
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering


Degree and Year of Graduation
MEng, 2010

Advisor
Rich Vogel, School of Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Primary Research Interests
Watershed management, ecologial flows, balance between humans and nature

Post-Graduation Employer and Position
Paddle sport guy at Next Adventure

 
WSSS Student John Parker

John Parker
Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy / Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy
Agriculture, Food, and the Environment Program


Degree and Year of Graduation
MALD/MS, 2012

Advisor
Astier Almedom, Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy

Primary Research Topic
Facilitating land and water management innovation in rain-fed smallholder farms in the semi-arid tropics

Enhancing soil moisture or “green water” management has become increasingly recognized as essential for achieving higher crop yields, improving agricultural water management, and alleviating poverty in rain-fed smallholder farms in semi-arid and arid regions. Achieving improvements in green water management requires smallholder farmers to adopt on-farm land and water management practices including conservation tillage, mulching and compost use, and terraces and furrows. In many rain-fed agricultural regions, however, there has been limited adoption of these practices by smallholder farmers exemplifying the frequent disconnect between new concepts and theories and on-the-ground realities. How might the increased uptake of these practices by smallholder farmers be achieved? By analyzing the successful widespread adoption of the Quesungual Slash-and-Mulch Agroforestry System (QSMAS) in Central America and Southeast Asia through social-ecological resilience theory and diffusion of innovations theory, this research seeks to improve our understanding of how and why land and water management innovations occur in smallholder farms and how sustainable improvements in green water management might be achieved.

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills, Software, Languages
Implementer of USAID-funded watershed management programs in Central America; Hands-on technical skills related to small-scale aquaculture production, livestock production, agro- and analog forestry, and on-farm soil and water conservation technologies.

Languages
Spanish, Kichwa (Ecuadorian Amazon basin region)

Selected Awards & Fellowships
WSSS Research Fellowship, 2010

 
Allie Quady

Allison Quady
Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy
Agriculture, Food and Environment Program
School of Medicine
Public Health and Professional Degree Programs


Degree and Year of Graduation
MS Nutrition/MPH, 2009

Advisor
Kathleen Merrigan

Primary Research Topic
Recovery of Cryptosporidium oocysts in reclaimed wastewater

My WSSS-related research is in regards to the water and feces borne protozoa, Cryptosporidium, and a new device developed by Tufts Veterinary School researchers to improve recovery rates of the organism in reclaimed effluent. The device is a continuous flow centrifuge and can concentrate oocysts in large volumes (10-100 liters) of water. The Tufts method contrasts with the existing EPA method that uses a more expensive filter which clogs easily with large volumes of water. Working in the Veterinary School lab this summer I found the two methods to not be significantly different in oocyst recovery rates. The information will be useful to water treatment plants in case of a new EPA regulation requiring Cryptosporidium testing.

Other Project Titles
Implementing a gardening program with the St Francis House community; Future project proposal: Interviews with Massachusetts' teachers for their views on agriculture in the classroom

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills, Software, Languages
SPSS, SAS, and GIS; fluent in French, Spanish

Read an extended interview with Allie >>

WSSS student Nate Rawding

Nathan Rawding
Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning


Degree and Year of Graduation
MA, 2011

Advisor
Rusty Russell, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning

 
WSSS student Patrick Ray

Patrick Ray
School of Engineering
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering


Degree and Year of Graduation
PhD, 2009

Advisors
Richard Vogel, School of Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Paul Kirshen, School of Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Primary Research Interests
Water management and the Middle East

Water resources system decision makers have difficult jobs. Water resources system decision makers in Amman, Jordan, have particularly difficult jobs. We have been working on an optimization model to assist a hypothetical decision maker in Jordan in the process of water system planning and management. We want to present the decision maker with information on the initial capital cost of the proposed water system, its expected operation and maintenance costs, and its likely performance (e.g., reliability, vulnerability, and sustainability). We want to provide him/her with the means to choose from a number of substantially varied alternative water system designs based upon the particular requirements of his/her (natural, political, economic, and social) environment. The difficulty, of course, is the uncertainty in which future conditions, and therefore the future performance of the proposed water system, are shrouded. In order to properly inform the decision maker we must properly communicate the likely effects of uncertainty (e.g., changes in climatic, demographic, economic, or political conditions) on the proposed water system, and provide the decision maker with a logical, understandable method for inserting into the decision his or her tolerance for various forms of risk.

We have learned that, among the various techniques used for uncertainty analysis in optimization modeling, robust optimization (RO) might be the best qualified for evaluation and control of the various risks of poor system performance resulting from the uncertainties in the data input to water resources problems. Due to the great deal of variety in the use of, and some amount of confusion regarding, the term RO in the water resources literature, we offer an updated definition of the term for use in this field, and an improved formulation of the model to account for some well know deficiencies in the original formulation.

We then applied the improved formulation to the water system in Amman. The RO model designed for Amman provides the essential information on tradeoffs to be made between traditional water development paths (megascale projects such as the Disi Aquifer and desalinated water from the Red Sea), and greater reliance on wastewater reclamation and nonpotable reuse. The results of the model in terms of cost, risk of cost overruns, and risk of water shortages make a strong argument for deviation from the traditional water development path toward adoption of greater levels of water reuse.

Other Project Titles
- Dual Quality Optimization of the Integrated Water System in Beirut, Lebanon
- Water as a Source of Conflict and Cooperation: Exploring the Potential Issues in the Provision of Water and Sanitation to Rapidly Expanding Peri-Urban Areas
- Suggestions for the Improvement of Water Supply to the Landless Poor of Abidjan, Ivory Coast

Dissertation
Ray, Patrick. Integrated Optimization of a Dual Quality Water and Wastewater System: A Case Study of Greater Beirut, Lebanon. PhD CEE 2009. Advisor: Dr. Paul Kirshen

Thesis
Ray, Patrick. Integrated Optimization of a Dual Quality Water and Wastewater System: A Case Study of Greater Beirut, Lebanon. PhD CEE 2009. Advisor: Dr. Paul Kirshen

Publications
Ray, P., P.H. Kirshen and R.M. Vogel, Integrated optimization of a dual quality water and wastewater system, Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management, Vol. 136, No. 1, pp. 37-47, 2010.

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills, Software, Languages
GAMS and LINGO (optimization tools); Visual Basic programming language; EPANET2 (pipe network simulation); AutoCAD 14/2000; MathCAD; Matlab; MINITAB (statistical software); ESRI Arcmap/ArcCatalog/ ArcToolbox (GIS tools)

Post-Graduation Employer and Position
Assistant Professor at Middle East University

Read an extended interview with Patrick >>

 
WSSS Alum Sarah Reich

Sarah Reich
Graduate School of Arts & Sciences
Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning


Degree and Year of Graduation
MA, 2006

Advisors
Julian Agyeman (UEP) and Rusty Russell (UEP)

 

Primary Research Topic
Constructing Identity: The Role of the Watershed Organization in Bringing Meaning to the Watershed

The concept of watershed identity draws together ideas developed in a wide range of disciples from psychology to human geography. A limited, though growing, body of research indicates that these ideas—place attachment and sense of place—are useful conceptions that may help to explain people’s awareness of a watershed and their willingness to change personal behaviors to promote a watershed’s environmental integrity. In this thesis, four theoretical propositions are introduced to describe the watershed organization’s role in the development of watershed identity. The analysis indicates that watershed organizations play several important roles in constructing and mediating watershed identity: defining the watershed’s physical space; constructing and communicating the watershed’s symbolic identity; fostering opportunities for individuals to develop functional relationships with the watershed; and connecting individuals who care about the watershed together under common purpose.

Thesis
Reich, Sarah L. Constructing Identity: The Role of the Watershed Organization in Bringing Meaning to the Watershed. MA UEP 2006. Advisor: Dr. Julian Agyeman

Publications

• Ward, B., E. MacMullan, and S. Reich. 2008. "The Effect of Low-Impact Development on Property Values." Proceedings of the Water Environment Federation, Sustainability 2008. Pp. 318-323. http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/wef/wefproc/2008/00002008/00000006/art00022

• New England Interstate Water Pollution Control Commission. 2006. The Cost of Clean and Safe Water: Sustaining Our Water Infrastructure. May. http://www.neiwpcc.org/neiwpcc_docs/costofcleanwater.pdf

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills, Software, Languages
Using economic techniques to analyze the value of water-related ecosystem goods and services, including non-market goods and services.

Post-Graduation Employer and Position
ECONorthwest (www.econw.com), Policy Analyst

Relevant Projects
I have been working on a variety of water-related projects at ECONorthwest, all focused on exploring how water-related ecosystems and socio-economic systems interact, and how to use economic tools to describe the value of water-related goods and services. Here are some water-related topics I’ve worked on recently:

- Low-impact development, green infrastructure, and sustainable site design
- Watershed and ecosystem restoration and preservation
- Agricultural and urban water use, including conservation and efficiency efforts
- The full range of economic effects of water-bottling projects

KatieResnick

Katie Resnick
Graduate School of Arts & Sciences
Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning


Degree and Year of Graduation
MA, 2009

Advisors
Rusty Russell, Justin Hollander, Kent Portney

 

Primary Research Topic
Enhancing Local Capacities for Stormwater Management in Nassau, New Providence, The Bahamas

An integrated stormwater assessment of Nassau was conducted. Nassau was chosen as a proxy for other well-developed, working waterfronts in the Caribbean that serve as fishing and shipping ports, tourism centers, cruise ship harbors, and economic centers. Two hypotheses were proposed from a policy perspective:

-The success of regulatory strategies or lack thereof has direct implications on stormwater management and coastal water quality.

-The lack of successful regulatory strategies provides opportunity for the development of non-regulatory strategies in managing stormwater in The Bahamas.

A land use inventory was conducted on the ground to determine land use patterns around Nassau harbor, and pollutant loading was estimated using the results of the land use analysis and modeling using the Simple Method. Additionally, government agencies and non-governmental organizations were interviewed to determine the extent of management regimes and potential capacity to address stormwater management issues.

Thesis
Resnick, Katie. 2009. Sealing the Envelope: How Urban New England Communities can mitigate Climate Change by Encouraging Energy Efficient Home Renovations. Tufts University. 78 pp.

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills, Software, Languages
ArcGIS, Statistical Software (SPSS, MiniTab), water quality monitoring and analysis, wetland delineation, watershed mapping, nutrient loading and water balance modeling

Post-Graduation Employer and Position
Environmental Planner at Horsley Witten Group

Read an extended interview with Katie >>

 

Ana Rosner
School of Engineering
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering


Degree and Expected Year of Graduation
MS, 2012

Advisor
Rich Vogel, School of Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Selected Awards & Fellowships
WSSS Research Fellowship, 2011

 

Jesus A. Sanchez
Graduate School of Engineering
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering


Degree and Year of Graduation
MS, 2009

Advisor
Rich Vogel

Primary Research Topic
The Probability Distribution of Natural Hazards: Earthquakes, Winds, Floods, and Bird Extinctions

Datasets of natural hazard phenomena tend to be heterogeneous and involve multiple samples m, both aspects inhibiting inter-sample comparative analysis. Most existing methods are quite elaborate and intensive, requiring m individual hypothesis tests followed by field significance tests which combine results from individual tests. In this study, a new method for distribution identification is introduced, which involves a data normalization technique that enables an evaluation of the probability distribution of m samples arising from both homogeneous and heterogeneous populations using a single probability plot. The use of a single probability plot is shown to be advantageous as it provides a single metric to compare the goodness-of-fit of multiple alternative distributions.

The proposed data normalization results in a single normalized sample that enables the use of a single hypothesis test to evaluate the probability distribution of multiple m samples. We show via hypotheses tests and power studies that the approach can efficiently and effectively identify the ‘parent’ probability distribution using a single probability plot and its associated probability plot correlation coefficient hypothesis test. ‘Parent’ distribution identification is performed on several large-scale data sets of natural hazards including: bird sighting records, earthquake magnitudes, wind speeds, and flood discharges to enable comparisons of the results with previously published work. The conclusions of this study agree with previous studies in all cases, and further results are obtained, although still somewhat speculative, should encourage future research to further evaluate the proposed approach.

Other Project Titles
Rainfall runoff modeling and calibration: "Utilizing Seasonal Forecasts for Reservoir Operations in the Comoé River Basin, Burkina Faso".

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills, Software, Languages:
HydroCAD; SWMM; MATLAB; urban watershed model development and calibration; development of unique statistical techniques for probabilistic analyses; application of appropriate water distribution and treatment system technologies in rural communities; spanish proficiency.

Post-Graduation Employer and Position
Senior Staff Engineer at Geosyntec Consultants

 

Anne Elizabeth Sexton
Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning


Degree and Year of Graduation
MS, 2013

Advisor
Robert Russell

Primary Research Topic
Buffer zone protection, stormwater mitigation, water quality

Water-Relevant Experiences
Internship with Chattahoochee Riverkeeper, Mystic River Watershed Association

Thesis or Dissertation
The Grey Zone: A Look at Stream Buffer Zone Protection Regulations for Georgia's Trout Streams

Abstract: Land adjacent to water bodies, or riparian zones, are critical to the health of aquatic ecosystems in that they filter pollutants, moderate temperature, and reduce sedimentation. Brook trout, which are native to many north Georgia streams, are losing habitat due to rising stream temperatures and sedimentation attributed to human development of riparian zones. Georgia’s primary tool to protect riparian zones is the Erosion and Sedimentation Act, which originally required 100 feet of unaltered buffer areas along all water bodies. Changes to the Act in 2000 reduced trout stream buffer widths to 50 feet with a promise to revisit the topic once the University of Georgia published an evaluation of reduction effects. After publication, political pressures left the issue unaddressed. This thesis analyzes the politics of the buffer reduction and the influence the university study had in post-reduction amendments, and concludes with recommendations to improve the current buffer protection program.

View online here.
 
Janice Snow

Janice Snow
Graduate School of Arts & Sciences
Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning


Degree and Year of Graduation
MA, 2009

Advisors
Sheldon Krimsky, Ann Rappaport and George Ellmore

Primary Research Topic
Misunderstanding Soil Ecosystems: Consequences for Land, Water and Climate Policy

Without functioning soil ecosystems life on earth as we know it would not exist. Soil ecosystems affect global climate change, carbon sequestration, the quantity and quality of fresh water, the productivity and nutritional value of plants growing in soil, the success of invasive organisms, the health of bays and estuaries and the availability of new medicines for human health. Belowground ecosystems are key drivers of the global cycles of carbon, water, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur; yet, the U.S. has no policy to protect the biological integrity of soil systems as it does for water? Flawed conceptual models of soil functions due in part to lack of cross-disciplinary approaches have been cited by soil ecologists as contributing to inadequate funding of research in the U. S. and lack of policy to protect soil ecosystems. The thesis analyzes conceptual models of soil held by a variety of interest groups and answers the following questions:

- What role if any have commercial interests, research funding, soil policy history, disciplinary boundaries, economic and political interests played in promoting our limited understanding of soil ecosystems?

- What points of view, what biases are embedded in the language used to describe soil by various interest groups?

- What conceptual models and language should be presented to policy makers and to the public to correct their misunderstanding of soil ecosystems' role in local and global environmental health?

Other Project Titles
Adapting to Climate Change in the Alewife Basin: A Case Study;
Boston's Groundwater Crisis: Seeking Sound Water Policies in an Unnatural Watershed; Black's Nook Pond Water Quality Analysis & Management Recommendations; Integrating Land Use Policy and Watershed Protection: The Rhode Island Approach; Privatizing Urban Water Systems to Achieve Millennium Development Goals:
Effects on Human and Environmental Health: Lessons and Cases

Thesis
Snow, Janice. Misunderstanding Soil Ecosystems: How flawed conceptions of soil have lead to flawed U.S. land, water, and climate policies. MA UEP 2009. Advisor: Sheldon Krimsky

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills, Software, Languages
Vice Chair, Advisory Board for Cambridge Water System's Fresh Pond Reservation; co-author, Fresh Pond Reservation Master Plan; Water Policy Intern, Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs.

 

Edward Spang
Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy
International Environment and Resource Policy


Degree and Year of Graduation
PhD, 2011

Advisors
Bill Moomaw, Kelly Gallagher, Paul Kirshen (Battelle Consulting), David Marks (MIT)

Primary Research Topic
Understanding the Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of the Energy-Water Nexus

Sustainable water and energy systems are fundamental to human civilization and the global environment. However, increasing demand and inadequate sectoral management are stressing these resource systems in many regions of the globe. Considering these two systems are highly integrated, it is important for policymakers to understand how the links between these resources change over time and from region to region. This research focuses on the development and application of a set of indicators to track and map the coupled nature of water and energy systems temporally and spatially to highlight potential opportunities for integrated management of these resources.

Other Project Titles
The Potential for Wind-Powered Desalination in Water-Scarce Countries (Master's Thesis); Alpine Lakes and Glaciers of Peru: Managing Sources of Water and Destruction (TIE Grant Project); Interdisciplinary Rapid Watershed Assessment in Central America (Mesoamerican Barrier Reef Systems Project)

Thesis
Spang, Edward. The Potential for Wind-Powered Desalination in Water-Scarce Countries. MALD Fletcher 2006. Advisor: Dr. William Moomaw

Publications

• Spang, E. (2006) “The Potential for Wind-Powered Desalination in Water-Scarce Countries” in Pulido Bosch, A., and M. Perez Garcia (eds.), Communications to the International Conference on Renewable Energy and Water Technologies, Vol. I: WRE 80-85, Almeria, Spain. ISBN 84-933658-3-1

• Spang, E. & McLellan, M. (Eds.). (2006) Focus on Africa: Justice and Development. Praxis: The Fletcher Journal of Human Security. Medford: Tufts University.

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills, Software, Languages
ArcGIS, System Dynamics Modeling, Field Research on integrated watershed and coastal zone management for the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef Systems Project (Belize), Field research on water resource vulnerability and melting glaciers (Peru), Research on Low-Impact Development technologies for the WEAP modeling platform (SEI-US), Spanish, Moderate Portuguese.

Post-Graduation Employer and Position
Green Islands Project Coordinator. MIT-Portugal Program. Research coordinator for the development of integrated clean energy strategies for the Azores.

 

Ayron Strauch
Graduate School of Arts & Sciences
Department of Biology


Degree and Year of Graduation
PhD, 2011

Advisors
Astier Almedom, Michael Reed, Francie Chew, David Gute, John Durant, Joann Lindenmayer

Primary Research Topic
Water quality impacts on social and ecological systems in Northern Tanzania

Water resources in the Serengeti ecosystem are spatially and temporally variable and the result of regionally disparate geological and biological conditions as well as local differences in traditional
resource management (TRM). This asymmetry has repercussions for the seasonal distribution of large mammals, the cycling of nutrients, and the health of communities. My objective is to understand the variability of water resource quality and how TRM affects the health of households. I hypothesize that particular water-related uses severely impact water quality but that the level of contamination varies based on the time of use, the season, and the individual water source. There are likely to be social and traditional mechanisms in the village that limit contamination, either by temporal or spatial separation of conflicting water-related uses. Whether these mechanisms promote human health or adversely impact the ecosystem is unknown.

Thesis
Strauch, A.M., A.R. Kapust and C.C. Jost. Impact of livestock management on water quality and streambank structure in a semi-arid, African ecosystem. Journal of Arid Environments, Volume 73, Issue 9, September 2009, Pages 795-803.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaridenv.2009.03.012.

Publications
Strauch, A.M., Seasonal variability in faecal bacteria of semiarid rivers in the Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, Marine and Freshwater Research, Vol 62, 2011, pp 1191-1200.

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills, Software, Languages
Intern as Water Chemistry Analyst, New England Aquarium, GIS analysis of water related behavior in rural Tanzania

 

Justine Treadwell
Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy


Degree and Year of Graduation
MALD, 2009

Advisor
Steve Block

Primary Research Topic
Irrigation policy and practice in lakeshore communities of Malawi

Other Project Titles
Does Tobacco as a Cash Crop in Malawi Make Economic Sense in Light of Endemic Food Insecurity?

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills, Software, Languages
Special water related experience: erosion control through soil improvement and edible groundcover in tropical agriculture; permaculture systems design and management; Kiswahili, Chichewa (Malawi/Zambia), some Spanish

 

Yu-shiou Tsai
School of Engineering
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering


Degree and Expected Year of Graduation
PhD, 2011

Advisors
Richard Vogel, School of Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Sabir Umarov, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Department of Mathematics
Jeffrey Zabel, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Department of Economics

Primary Research Interests
Assessing climate and anthropogenic impacts on freshwater availability across the US, water-saving-efficiency assessments on the water conservation programs implemented in Ipswich Watershed

 

Ellen Parry Tyler
Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy
Agriculture, Food and the Environment Program


Degree and Year of Graduation
MS, 2011

Advisor
Parke Wilde, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy

Primary Research Interests
Ecosystem Approach to Regional Food Systems, Seafood Sustainability

Selected Awards & Fellowships
• “Fisheries Management Re-localized” Northwest Atlantic Marine Alliance (2010)
• Dow Sustainability Innovation Student Challenge Winner (2010)
• “Food Policy Councils: Lessons Learned” Institute Food and Development Policy (2009)

Water-Relevant Experiences
• By Land & By Sea: Connecting Maine’s Fishing and Farming Communities, Founding Partner (2009-2010) http://www.tufts.edu/alumni/magazine/winter2011/planet-tufts/surf.html
• North Atlantic Marine Alliance: Intern, then Fish Locally Collaborative co-leader (2010-Present)
• Massachusetts Institute of Technology Sea Grant Program, Research Assistant with Regional Ocean Science Initiative: Climate Change Outreach (Spring 2010)

Current Status
• Consultant, Enhancing Food Security of Underserved Populations in the Northeast through Sustainable Regional Food Systems: baseline data on regional fisheries production
• Co-leader, Markets Transformation Workgroup, Fish Locally Collaborative

 
WSSS Student Eric Vaughan

Eric Vaughan
School of Engineering
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering


Degree and Year of Graduation
MS, 2011

Advisors
Rich Vogel, School of Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Tim Griffin, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Agriculture, Food and Environment Program

Annette Huber-Lee, School of Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Primary Research Interests
Water resources management in water scarce regions

Proper long term planning is vital to mitigating the impact of future economic shocks caused by increasingly non-stationary hydrologic conditions, demographic shifts and land-use changes. Under-developed nations are particularly vulnerable due to poverty and lack of capacity, particularly where water is already scarce. Additionally, they often lack the tools required to effectively evaluate future conditions. My research focuses on developing economic water allocation models that improve the efficient use of water resources in water scarce regions, particularly in the developing world. I am currently working on a project for the Middle East.

Related Software
GAMS, WEAP, Python, MapWindow GIS, Excel with VBA

Selected Awards & Fellowships
WSSS Research Fellowship, 2010

 
WSSS Student Samantha Weaver

Samantha Weaver
Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning


Degree and Year of Graduation
MA, 2012

Advisor
Ann Rappaport, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning

Primary Research Interests
I am interested in climate mitigation and adaptation strategies, and integrating energy and water policy as part of local and national planning efforts to address climate change. I became interested in water and climate change when I participated in field research related to coral reef bleaching off the coast of southern Thailand as an undergraduate. I speak functional Spanish and Thai.

Related Software
I have experience with SQL database scripting, Microsoft Excel and Access.

 
WSSS Student Kendall Webster

Kendall Webster
Graduate School of Arts & Sciences
Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning


Degree and Year of Graduation
MA, 2011

Advisor
Rusty Russell, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning

Primary Research Topic
Conservation and advocacy for water bodies, watersheds, aquifers, etc.

This concern stems from my environmentalist background, and I believe that if you can protect a watershed, you're also protecting the ecosystem around the watershed. I am interested in handling water conservation issues from a policy standpoint, although the idea of working in politics makes my skin crawl. Right now I'm looking at alternatives to politics. For my thesis, I may research the strategies of non-profit organizations like the Nature Conservancy, which buys open space to restrict development and protect the resources it holds. This is one of my favourite models for conservation. However, I do believe that stringent policy for watershed protection should be developed in the next couple of years.

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills, Software, Languages
I've travelled all over the world and consider myself a very experienced traveller. I think this will come in very handy when we go south for the field project. I also speak Spanish, which has been extremely helpful for me in all that I do.
Also, I'm a water polo player and a great swimmer. That's a pretty literal water-relevant skill!
On a more serious note, I don't have much technical experience with water issues. I've just learned how to delineate a watershed, prepare a hydrological budget for it and calculate the total maximum daily load of contaminants to it from Scott Horsley, although I wouldn't say that I'm a pro at that.
I'm looking forward to learning everything I can about water in the certificate program.

Post-Graduation Employer and Position
Development Director at Yikes Tikes

 
WSSS Student Adam Weinberg

Adam Weinberg
Graduate School of Arts & Sciences
Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning


Degree and Year of Graduation
MA, 2013

Advisor
Rusty Russell, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning

Primary Research Topic
Water Resource Management and Policy


Thesis or Dissertation
Streamflow Depletion in Beaver Brook and the Impact of Implementing Sustainable Yield Guidelines

Water-Relevant Experiences, Technical Skills, Software, Languages
Five years groundwater remediation experience.

 
WSSS Student Ingrid Weiss

Ingrid Weiss
Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy
Food Policy and Applied Nutrition Program


Degree and Year of Graduation
MS, 2011

Advisor
Shibani Ghosh, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy

 
 
WSSS Student Ruiruo Wu

Ruiruo Wu
School of Engineering
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering


Degree and Year of Graduation
MS, 2013

Advisor
Elena Naumova

 
Primary Research Topic
Environmental Health

Selected Awards
School of Engineering Scholarship

Water-Relevant Experiences
AGU Fall meeting, SFO, CA (2012)

Thesis or Dissertation
Time series analysis of heat stroke related hospitalizations in the elderly residents in the Boston Metropolitan Statistical Area, from 1991 to 2006

Abstract: The adverse impacts of extreme weather on human health are attracting substantial attentions of public health professionals, environmental scientists, and policy makers. This study investigates the direct effects of high ambient temperatures on health of older adults residing in the Boston Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) using time series analysis. This study has three goals: to investigate the seasonality of hospitalizations due to heat stroke (HSH); to describe the association between ambient temperature and HSHs; and to determine the independent effect of heat waves on HSHs in the presence of well-pronounced seasonality. Medical records were abstracted form the Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Services from 1991 through 2006 and regressed against daily meteorological records using Poisson generalized linear regression model. The seasonal peaks in HSHs follow the peak in ambient temperature. While ambient temperature is positively correlated with HSHs the relationship exhibits strong exponential growth when temperature exceeds a certain threshold point. The proposed transformation of daily temperature facilitates the capture of rapid increase in HSHs beyond the threshold. Six types of indicator variables were tested to determine the effects of heat waves and their lag structures. The final regression model includes terms for ambient temperatures transformed with respect to threshold points, the best indicator variable for heat waves adjusted for annual, seasonal and weekly fluctuations explains 56% variability in HSHs. The developed methodology for building and validating a regression model sensitive to local temperature features can be further extended to other locations and health outcomes.

Publications
Ruiruo Wu, Liss Alexander, Elena Naumova, Effects of extreme weather on human health: methodology review, 2012 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, Dec., 2012

Liss Alexander, Ruiruo Wu, Elena Naumova, Estimating adverse effects of extreme weather events on human health: a systematic review of statistical methodology, JSM2013, Montreal, Canada, Aug., 2013

 
WSSS student Shuo Zhao

Shuo Zhao
School of Engineering
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering


Degree and Year of Graduation
MS, 2013

Advisors
John Durant

Primary Research Topic
Water Quality Modeling, Sediment Transport and Stormwater Management

 
WSSS student Viktoria Zoltay

Viktoria Zoltay
School of Engineering
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering


Degree and Year of Graduation
MS, 2007

Advisors
Richard Vogel, School of Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Paul Kirshen, School of Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Thesis
Zoltay, Viktoria. Integrated Watershed Management Modeling: Optimal Decision Making for Natural and Human Components. MS CEE 2007. Advisors: Dr. Paul Kirshen, Dr. Rich Vogel, Dr. Kirk Westphal

Publications
Zoltay, V.I., P.H. Kirshen, R.M. Vogel and K.S. Westphal, Integrated Watershed Management Modeling: A Generic Optimization Model Applied to the Ipswich River Basin, Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management, Vol 136, No. 5, pp 566-575, Sept/Oct 2010.

 

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The Water: Systems, Science and Society (WSSS) program is a graduate research and education program that provides Tufts students with interdisciplinary perspectives and tools to manage water-related problems around the world.

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